Source code for robot.libraries.BuiltIn

#  Copyright 2008-2015 Nokia Solutions and Networks
#
#  Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
#  you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
#  You may obtain a copy of the License at
#
#      http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
#
#  Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
#  distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
#  WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
#  See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
#  limitations under the License.

import difflib
import re
import time
import token
from tokenize import generate_tokens, untokenize

from robot.api import logger
from robot.errors import (ContinueForLoop, DataError, ExecutionFailed,
                          ExecutionFailures, ExecutionPassed, ExitForLoop,
                          PassExecution, ReturnFromKeyword)
from robot.running import Keyword, RUN_KW_REGISTER
from robot.running.context import EXECUTION_CONTEXTS
from robot.running.usererrorhandler import UserErrorHandler
from robot.utils import (DotDict, escape, format_assign_message,
                         get_error_message, get_time, is_falsy, is_integer,
                         is_string, is_truthy, is_unicode, IRONPYTHON, JYTHON,
                         Matcher, normalize, NormalizedDict, parse_time, prepr,
                         RERAISED_EXCEPTIONS, plural_or_not as s, roundup,
                         secs_to_timestr, seq2str, split_from_equals, StringIO,
                         timestr_to_secs, type_name, unic)
from robot.utils.asserts import assert_equal, assert_not_equal
from robot.variables import (is_list_var, is_var, DictVariableTableValue,
                             VariableTableValue, VariableSplitter,
                             variable_not_found)
from robot.version import get_version

if JYTHON:
    from java.lang import String, Number


# TODO: Clean-up registering run keyword variants in RF 3.1.
# https://github.com/robotframework/robotframework/issues/2190

[docs]def run_keyword_variant(resolve): def decorator(method): RUN_KW_REGISTER.register_run_keyword('BuiltIn', method.__name__, resolve, deprecation_warning=False) return method return decorator
class _BuiltInBase(object): @property def _context(self): return self._get_context() def _get_context(self, top=False): ctx = EXECUTION_CONTEXTS.current if not top else EXECUTION_CONTEXTS.top if ctx is None: raise RobotNotRunningError('Cannot access execution context') return ctx @property def _namespace(self): return self._get_context().namespace @property def _variables(self): return self._namespace.variables def _matches(self, string, pattern): # Must use this instead of fnmatch when string may contain newlines. matcher = Matcher(pattern, caseless=False, spaceless=False) return matcher.match(string) def _is_true(self, condition): if is_string(condition): condition = self.evaluate(condition, modules='os,sys') return bool(condition) def _log_types(self, *args): self._log_types_at_level('DEBUG', *args) def _log_types_at_level(self, level, *args): msg = ["Argument types are:"] + [self._get_type(a) for a in args] self.log('\n'.join(msg), level) def _get_type(self, arg): # In IronPython type(u'x') is str. We want to report unicode anyway. if is_unicode(arg): return "<type 'unicode'>" return str(type(arg)) class _Converter(_BuiltInBase): def convert_to_integer(self, item, base=None): """Converts the given item to an integer number. If the given item is a string, it is by default expected to be an integer in base 10. There are two ways to convert from other bases: - Give base explicitly to the keyword as ``base`` argument. - Prefix the given string with the base so that ``0b`` means binary (base 2), ``0o`` means octal (base 8), and ``0x`` means hex (base 16). The prefix is considered only when ``base`` argument is not given and may itself be prefixed with a plus or minus sign. The syntax is case-insensitive and possible spaces are ignored. Examples: | ${result} = | Convert To Integer | 100 | | # Result is 100 | | ${result} = | Convert To Integer | FF AA | 16 | # Result is 65450 | | ${result} = | Convert To Integer | 100 | 8 | # Result is 64 | | ${result} = | Convert To Integer | -100 | 2 | # Result is -4 | | ${result} = | Convert To Integer | 0b100 | | # Result is 4 | | ${result} = | Convert To Integer | -0x100 | | # Result is -256 | See also `Convert To Number`, `Convert To Binary`, `Convert To Octal`, `Convert To Hex`, and `Convert To Bytes`. """ self._log_types(item) return self._convert_to_integer(item, base) def _convert_to_integer(self, orig, base=None): try: item = self._handle_java_numbers(orig) item, base = self._get_base(item, base) if base: return int(item, self._convert_to_integer(base)) return int(item) except: raise RuntimeError("'%s' cannot be converted to an integer: %s" % (orig, get_error_message())) def _handle_java_numbers(self, item): if not JYTHON: return item if isinstance(item, String): return unic(item) if isinstance(item, Number): return item.doubleValue() return item def _get_base(self, item, base): if not is_string(item): return item, base item = normalize(item) if item.startswith(('-', '+')): sign = item[0] item = item[1:] else: sign = '' bases = {'0b': 2, '0o': 8, '0x': 16} if base or not item.startswith(tuple(bases)): return sign+item, base return sign+item[2:], bases[item[:2]] def convert_to_binary(self, item, base=None, prefix=None, length=None): """Converts the given item to a binary string. The ``item``, with an optional ``base``, is first converted to an integer using `Convert To Integer` internally. After that it is converted to a binary number (base 2) represented as a string such as ``1011``. The returned value can contain an optional ``prefix`` and can be required to be of minimum ``length`` (excluding the prefix and a possible minus sign). If the value is initially shorter than the required length, it is padded with zeros. Examples: | ${result} = | Convert To Binary | 10 | | | # Result is 1010 | | ${result} = | Convert To Binary | F | base=16 | prefix=0b | # Result is 0b1111 | | ${result} = | Convert To Binary | -2 | prefix=B | length=4 | # Result is -B0010 | See also `Convert To Integer`, `Convert To Octal` and `Convert To Hex`. """ return self._convert_to_bin_oct_hex(item, base, prefix, length, 'b') def convert_to_octal(self, item, base=None, prefix=None, length=None): """Converts the given item to an octal string. The ``item``, with an optional ``base``, is first converted to an integer using `Convert To Integer` internally. After that it is converted to an octal number (base 8) represented as a string such as ``775``. The returned value can contain an optional ``prefix`` and can be required to be of minimum ``length`` (excluding the prefix and a possible minus sign). If the value is initially shorter than the required length, it is padded with zeros. Examples: | ${result} = | Convert To Octal | 10 | | | # Result is 12 | | ${result} = | Convert To Octal | -F | base=16 | prefix=0 | # Result is -017 | | ${result} = | Convert To Octal | 16 | prefix=oct | length=4 | # Result is oct0020 | See also `Convert To Integer`, `Convert To Binary` and `Convert To Hex`. """ return self._convert_to_bin_oct_hex(item, base, prefix, length, 'o') def convert_to_hex(self, item, base=None, prefix=None, length=None, lowercase=False): """Converts the given item to a hexadecimal string. The ``item``, with an optional ``base``, is first converted to an integer using `Convert To Integer` internally. After that it is converted to a hexadecimal number (base 16) represented as a string such as ``FF0A``. The returned value can contain an optional ``prefix`` and can be required to be of minimum ``length`` (excluding the prefix and a possible minus sign). If the value is initially shorter than the required length, it is padded with zeros. By default the value is returned as an upper case string, but the ``lowercase`` argument a true value (see `Boolean arguments`) turns the value (but not the given prefix) to lower case. Examples: | ${result} = | Convert To Hex | 255 | | | # Result is FF | | ${result} = | Convert To Hex | -10 | prefix=0x | length=2 | # Result is -0x0A | | ${result} = | Convert To Hex | 255 | prefix=X | lowercase=yes | # Result is Xff | See also `Convert To Integer`, `Convert To Binary` and `Convert To Octal`. """ spec = 'x' if is_truthy(lowercase) else 'X' return self._convert_to_bin_oct_hex(item, base, prefix, length, spec) def _convert_to_bin_oct_hex(self, item, base, prefix, length, format_spec): self._log_types(item) ret = format(self._convert_to_integer(item, base), format_spec) prefix = prefix or '' if ret[0] == '-': prefix = '-' + prefix ret = ret[1:] if length: ret = ret.rjust(self._convert_to_integer(length), '0') return prefix + ret def convert_to_number(self, item, precision=None): """Converts the given item to a floating point number. If the optional ``precision`` is positive or zero, the returned number is rounded to that number of decimal digits. Negative precision means that the number is rounded to the closest multiple of 10 to the power of the absolute precision. If a number is equally close to a certain precision, it is always rounded away from zero. Examples: | ${result} = | Convert To Number | 42.512 | | # Result is 42.512 | | ${result} = | Convert To Number | 42.512 | 1 | # Result is 42.5 | | ${result} = | Convert To Number | 42.512 | 0 | # Result is 43.0 | | ${result} = | Convert To Number | 42.512 | -1 | # Result is 40.0 | Notice that machines generally cannot store floating point numbers accurately. This may cause surprises with these numbers in general and also when they are rounded. For more information see, for example, these resources: - http://docs.python.org/2/tutorial/floatingpoint.html - http://randomascii.wordpress.com/2012/02/25/comparing-floating-point-numbers-2012-edition If you need an integer number, use `Convert To Integer` instead. """ self._log_types(item) return self._convert_to_number(item, precision) def _convert_to_number(self, item, precision=None): number = self._convert_to_number_without_precision(item) if precision is not None: number = roundup(number, self._convert_to_integer(precision), return_type=float) return number def _convert_to_number_without_precision(self, item): try: if JYTHON: item = self._handle_java_numbers(item) return float(item) except: error = get_error_message() try: return float(self._convert_to_integer(item)) except RuntimeError: raise RuntimeError("'%s' cannot be converted to a floating " "point number: %s" % (item, error)) def convert_to_string(self, item): """Converts the given item to a Unicode string. Uses ``__unicode__`` or ``__str__`` method with Python objects and ``toString`` with Java objects. Use `Encode String To Bytes` and `Decode Bytes To String` keywords in ``String`` library if you need to convert between Unicode and byte strings using different encodings. Use `Convert To Bytes` if you just want to create byte strings. """ self._log_types(item) return self._convert_to_string(item) def _convert_to_string(self, item): return unic(item) def convert_to_boolean(self, item): """Converts the given item to Boolean true or false. Handles strings ``True`` and ``False`` (case-insensitive) as expected, otherwise returns item's [http://docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#truth|truth value] using Python's ``bool()`` method. """ self._log_types(item) if is_string(item): if item.upper() == 'TRUE': return True if item.upper() == 'FALSE': return False return bool(item) def convert_to_bytes(self, input, input_type='text'): u"""Converts the given ``input`` to bytes according to the ``input_type``. Valid input types are listed below: - ``text:`` Converts text to bytes character by character. All characters with ordinal below 256 can be used and are converted to bytes with same values. Many characters are easiest to represent using escapes like ``\\x00`` or ``\\xff``. Supports both Unicode strings and bytes. - ``int:`` Converts integers separated by spaces to bytes. Similarly as with `Convert To Integer`, it is possible to use binary, octal, or hex values by prefixing the values with ``0b``, ``0o``, or ``0x``, respectively. - ``hex:`` Converts hexadecimal values to bytes. Single byte is always two characters long (e.g. ``01`` or ``FF``). Spaces are ignored and can be used freely as a visual separator. - ``bin:`` Converts binary values to bytes. Single byte is always eight characters long (e.g. ``00001010``). Spaces are ignored and can be used freely as a visual separator. In addition to giving the input as a string, it is possible to use lists or other iterables containing individual characters or numbers. In that case numbers do not need to be padded to certain length and they cannot contain extra spaces. Examples (last column shows returned bytes): | ${bytes} = | Convert To Bytes | hyv\xe4 | | # hyv\\xe4 | | ${bytes} = | Convert To Bytes | \\xff\\x07 | | # \\xff\\x07 | | ${bytes} = | Convert To Bytes | 82 70 | int | # RF | | ${bytes} = | Convert To Bytes | 0b10 0x10 | int | # \\x02\\x10 | | ${bytes} = | Convert To Bytes | ff 00 07 | hex | # \\xff\\x00\\x07 | | ${bytes} = | Convert To Bytes | 5246212121 | hex | # RF!!! | | ${bytes} = | Convert To Bytes | 0000 1000 | bin | # \\x08 | | ${input} = | Create List | 1 | 2 | 12 | | ${bytes} = | Convert To Bytes | ${input} | int | # \\x01\\x02\\x0c | | ${bytes} = | Convert To Bytes | ${input} | hex | # \\x01\\x02\\x12 | Use `Encode String To Bytes` in ``String`` library if you need to convert text to bytes using a certain encoding. New in Robot Framework 2.8.2. """ try: try: ordinals = getattr(self, '_get_ordinals_from_%s' % input_type) except AttributeError: raise RuntimeError("Invalid input type '%s'." % input_type) return bytes(bytearray(o for o in ordinals(input))) except: raise RuntimeError("Creating bytes failed: %s" % get_error_message()) def _get_ordinals_from_text(self, input): # https://github.com/IronLanguages/main/issues/1237 if IRONPYTHON and isinstance(input, bytearray): input = bytes(input) for char in input: ordinal = char if is_integer(char) else ord(char) yield self._test_ordinal(ordinal, char, 'Character') def _test_ordinal(self, ordinal, original, type): if 0 <= ordinal <= 255: return ordinal raise RuntimeError("%s '%s' cannot be represented as a byte." % (type, original)) def _get_ordinals_from_int(self, input): if is_string(input): input = input.split() elif is_integer(input): input = [input] for integer in input: ordinal = self._convert_to_integer(integer) yield self._test_ordinal(ordinal, integer, 'Integer') def _get_ordinals_from_hex(self, input): for token in self._input_to_tokens(input, length=2): ordinal = self._convert_to_integer(token, base=16) yield self._test_ordinal(ordinal, token, 'Hex value') def _get_ordinals_from_bin(self, input): for token in self._input_to_tokens(input, length=8): ordinal = self._convert_to_integer(token, base=2) yield self._test_ordinal(ordinal, token, 'Binary value') def _input_to_tokens(self, input, length): if not is_string(input): return input input = ''.join(input.split()) if len(input) % length != 0: raise RuntimeError('Expected input to be multiple of %d.' % length) return (input[i:i+length] for i in range(0, len(input), length)) def create_list(self, *items): """Returns a list containing given items. The returned list can be assigned both to ``${scalar}`` and ``@{list}`` variables. Examples: | @{list} = | Create List | a | b | c | | ${scalar} = | Create List | a | b | c | | ${ints} = | Create List | ${1} | ${2} | ${3} | """ return list(items) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=0) def create_dictionary(self, *items): """Creates and returns a dictionary based on given items. Items are given using ``key=value`` syntax same way as ``&{dictionary}`` variables are created in the Variable table. Both keys and values can contain variables, and possible equal sign in key can be escaped with a backslash like ``escaped\\=key=value``. It is also possible to get items from existing dictionaries by simply using them like ``&{dict}``. If same key is used multiple times, the last value has precedence. The returned dictionary is ordered, and values with strings as keys can also be accessed using convenient dot-access syntax like ``${dict.key}``. Examples: | &{dict} = | Create Dictionary | key=value | foo=bar | | Should Be True | ${dict} == {'key': 'value', 'foo': 'bar'} | | &{dict} = | Create Dictionary | ${1}=${2} | &{dict} | foo=new | | Should Be True | ${dict} == {1: 2, 'key': 'value', 'foo': 'new'} | | Should Be Equal | ${dict.key} | value | This keyword was changed in Robot Framework 2.9 in many ways: - Moved from ``Collections`` library to ``BuiltIn``. - Support also non-string keys in ``key=value`` syntax. - Deprecated old syntax to give keys and values separately. - Returned dictionary is ordered and dot-accessible. """ separate, combined = self._split_dict_items(items) if separate: # TODO: Deprecated in 2.9. Remove support for this in 3.1. self.log("Giving keys and values separately to 'Create Dictionary' " "keyword is deprecated. Use 'key=value' syntax instead.", level='WARN') separate = self._format_separate_dict_items(separate) combined = DictVariableTableValue(combined).resolve(self._variables) result = DotDict(separate) result.update(combined) return result def _split_dict_items(self, items): separate = [] for item in items: name, value = split_from_equals(item) if value is not None or VariableSplitter(item).is_dict_variable(): break separate.append(item) return separate, items[len(separate):] def _format_separate_dict_items(self, separate): separate = self._variables.replace_list(separate) if len(separate) % 2 != 0: raise DataError('Expected even number of keys and values, got %d.' % len(separate)) return [separate[i:i+2] for i in range(0, len(separate), 2)] class _Verify(_BuiltInBase): def _set_and_remove_tags(self, tags): set_tags = [tag for tag in tags if not tag.startswith('-')] remove_tags = [tag[1:] for tag in tags if tag.startswith('-')] if remove_tags: self.remove_tags(*remove_tags) if set_tags: self.set_tags(*set_tags) def fail(self, msg=None, *tags): """Fails the test with the given message and optionally alters its tags. The error message is specified using the ``msg`` argument. It is possible to use HTML in the given error message, similarly as with any other keyword accepting an error message, by prefixing the error with ``*HTML*``. It is possible to modify tags of the current test case by passing tags after the message. Tags starting with a hyphen (e.g. ``-regression``) are removed and others added. Tags are modified using `Set Tags` and `Remove Tags` internally, and the semantics setting and removing them are the same as with these keywords. Examples: | Fail | Test not ready | | | # Fails with the given message. | | Fail | *HTML*<b>Test not ready</b> | | | # Fails using HTML in the message. | | Fail | Test not ready | not-ready | | # Fails and adds 'not-ready' tag. | | Fail | OS not supported | -regression | | # Removes tag 'regression'. | | Fail | My message | tag | -t* | # Removes all tags starting with 't' except the newly added 'tag'. | See `Fatal Error` if you need to stop the whole test execution. Support for modifying tags was added in Robot Framework 2.7.4 and HTML message support in 2.8. """ self._set_and_remove_tags(tags) raise AssertionError(msg) if msg else AssertionError() def fatal_error(self, msg=None): """Stops the whole test execution. The test or suite where this keyword is used fails with the provided message, and subsequent tests fail with a canned message. Possible teardowns will nevertheless be executed. See `Fail` if you only want to stop one test case unconditionally. """ error = AssertionError(msg) if msg else AssertionError() error.ROBOT_EXIT_ON_FAILURE = True raise error def should_not_be_true(self, condition, msg=None): """Fails if the given condition is true. See `Should Be True` for details about how ``condition`` is evaluated and how ``msg`` can be used to override the default error message. """ if self._is_true(condition): raise AssertionError(msg or "'%s' should not be true." % condition) def should_be_true(self, condition, msg=None): """Fails if the given condition is not true. If ``condition`` is a string (e.g. ``${rc} < 10``), it is evaluated as a Python expression as explained in `Evaluating expressions` and the keyword status is decided based on the result. If a non-string item is given, the status is got directly from its [http://docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#truth|truth value]. The default error message (``<condition> should be true``) is not very informative, but it can be overridden with the ``msg`` argument. Examples: | Should Be True | ${rc} < 10 | | Should Be True | '${status}' == 'PASS' | # Strings must be quoted | | Should Be True | ${number} | # Passes if ${number} is not zero | | Should Be True | ${list} | # Passes if ${list} is not empty | Variables used like ``${variable}``, as in the examples above, are replaced in the expression before evaluation. Variables are also available in the evaluation namespace and can be accessed using special syntax ``$variable``. This is a new feature in Robot Framework 2.9 and it is explained more thoroughly in `Evaluating expressions`. Examples: | Should Be True | $rc < 10 | | Should Be True | $status == 'PASS' | # Expected string must be quoted | Starting from Robot Framework 2.8, `Should Be True` automatically imports Python's [http://docs.python.org/2/library/os.html|os] and [http://docs.python.org/2/library/sys.html|sys] modules that contain several useful attributes: | Should Be True | os.linesep == '\\n' | # Unixy | | Should Be True | os.linesep == '\\r\\n' | # Windows | | Should Be True | sys.platform == 'darwin' | # OS X | | Should Be True | sys.platform.startswith('java') | # Jython | """ if not self._is_true(condition): raise AssertionError(msg or "'%s' should be true." % condition) def should_be_equal(self, first, second, msg=None, values=True): """Fails if the given objects are unequal. Optional ``msg`` and ``values`` arguments specify how to construct the error message if this keyword fails: - If ``msg`` is not given, the error message is ``<first> != <second>``. - If ``msg`` is given and ``values`` gets a true value, the error message is ``<msg>: <first> != <second>``. - If ``msg`` is given and ``values`` gets a false value, the error message is simply ``<msg>``. ``values`` is true by default, but can be turned to false by using, for example, string ``false`` or ``no values``. See `Boolean arguments` section for more details. If both arguments are multiline strings, the comparison is done using `multiline string comparisons`. """ self._log_types_at_info_if_different(first, second) self._should_be_equal(first, second, msg, values) def _should_be_equal(self, first, second, msg, values): if first == second: return include_values = self._include_values(values) if include_values and is_string(first) and is_string(second): self._raise_multi_diff(first, second) assert_equal(first, second, msg, include_values) def _log_types_at_info_if_different(self, first, second): level = 'DEBUG' if type(first) == type(second) else 'INFO' self._log_types_at_level(level, first, second) def _raise_multi_diff(self, first, second): first_lines, second_lines = first.splitlines(), second.splitlines() if len(first_lines) < 3 or len(second_lines) < 3: return self.log("%s\n!=\n%s" % (first, second)) err = 'Multiline strings are different:\n' for line in difflib.unified_diff(first_lines, second_lines, fromfile='first', tofile='second', lineterm=''): err += line + '\n' raise AssertionError(err) def _include_values(self, values): return is_truthy(values) and str(values).upper() != 'NO VALUES' def should_not_be_equal(self, first, second, msg=None, values=True): """Fails if the given objects are equal. See `Should Be Equal` for an explanation on how to override the default error message with ``msg`` and ``values``. """ self._log_types_at_info_if_different(first, second) self._should_not_be_equal(first, second, msg, values) def _should_not_be_equal(self, first, second, msg, values): assert_not_equal(first, second, msg, self._include_values(values)) def should_not_be_equal_as_integers(self, first, second, msg=None, values=True, base=None): """Fails if objects are equal after converting them to integers. See `Convert To Integer` for information how to convert integers from other bases than 10 using ``base`` argument or ``0b/0o/0x`` prefixes. See `Should Be Equal` for an explanation on how to override the default error message with ``msg`` and ``values``. See `Should Be Equal As Integers` for some usage examples. """ self._log_types_at_info_if_different(first, second) self._should_not_be_equal(self._convert_to_integer(first, base), self._convert_to_integer(second, base), msg, values) def should_be_equal_as_integers(self, first, second, msg=None, values=True, base=None): """Fails if objects are unequal after converting them to integers. See `Convert To Integer` for information how to convert integers from other bases than 10 using ``base`` argument or ``0b/0o/0x`` prefixes. See `Should Be Equal` for an explanation on how to override the default error message with ``msg`` and ``values``. Examples: | Should Be Equal As Integers | 42 | ${42} | Error message | | Should Be Equal As Integers | ABCD | abcd | base=16 | | Should Be Equal As Integers | 0b1011 | 11 | """ self._log_types_at_info_if_different(first, second) self._should_be_equal(self._convert_to_integer(first, base), self._convert_to_integer(second, base), msg, values) def should_not_be_equal_as_numbers(self, first, second, msg=None, values=True, precision=6): """Fails if objects are equal after converting them to real numbers. The conversion is done with `Convert To Number` keyword using the given ``precision``. See `Should Be Equal As Numbers` for examples on how to use ``precision`` and why it does not always work as expected. See also `Should Be Equal` for an explanation on how to override the default error message with ``msg`` and ``values``. """ self._log_types_at_info_if_different(first, second) first = self._convert_to_number(first, precision) second = self._convert_to_number(second, precision) self._should_not_be_equal(first, second, msg, values) def should_be_equal_as_numbers(self, first, second, msg=None, values=True, precision=6): """Fails if objects are unequal after converting them to real numbers. The conversion is done with `Convert To Number` keyword using the given ``precision``. Examples: | Should Be Equal As Numbers | ${x} | 1.1 | | # Passes if ${x} is 1.1 | | Should Be Equal As Numbers | 1.123 | 1.1 | precision=1 | # Passes | | Should Be Equal As Numbers | 1.123 | 1.4 | precision=0 | # Passes | | Should Be Equal As Numbers | 112.3 | 75 | precision=-2 | # Passes | As discussed in the documentation of `Convert To Number`, machines generally cannot store floating point numbers accurately. Because of this limitation, comparing floats for equality is problematic and a correct approach to use depends on the context. This keyword uses a very naive approach of rounding the numbers before comparing them, which is both prone to rounding errors and does not work very well if numbers are really big or small. For more information about comparing floats, and ideas on how to implement your own context specific comparison algorithm, see http://randomascii.wordpress.com/2012/02/25/comparing-floating-point-numbers-2012-edition/. See `Should Not Be Equal As Numbers` for a negative version of this keyword and `Should Be Equal` for an explanation on how to override the default error message with ``msg`` and ``values``. """ self._log_types_at_info_if_different(first, second) first = self._convert_to_number(first, precision) second = self._convert_to_number(second, precision) self._should_be_equal(first, second, msg, values) def should_not_be_equal_as_strings(self, first, second, msg=None, values=True): """Fails if objects are equal after converting them to strings. See `Should Be Equal` for an explanation on how to override the default error message with ``msg`` and ``values``. """ self._log_types_at_info_if_different(first, second) first, second = [self._convert_to_string(i) for i in (first, second)] self._should_not_be_equal(first, second, msg, values) def should_be_equal_as_strings(self, first, second, msg=None, values=True): """Fails if objects are unequal after converting them to strings. See `Should Be Equal` for an explanation on how to override the default error message with ``msg`` and ``values``. If both arguments are multiline strings, the comparison is done using `multiline string comparisons`. """ self._log_types_at_info_if_different(first, second) first, second = [self._convert_to_string(i) for i in (first, second)] self._should_be_equal(first, second, msg, values) def should_not_start_with(self, str1, str2, msg=None, values=True): """Fails if the string ``str1`` starts with the string ``str2``. See `Should Be Equal` for an explanation on how to override the default error message with ``msg`` and ``values``. """ if str1.startswith(str2): raise AssertionError(self._get_string_msg(str1, str2, msg, values, 'starts with')) def should_start_with(self, str1, str2, msg=None, values=True): """Fails if the string ``str1`` does not start with the string ``str2``. See `Should Be Equal` for an explanation on how to override the default error message with ``msg`` and ``values``. """ if not str1.startswith(str2): raise AssertionError(self._get_string_msg(str1, str2, msg, values, 'does not start with')) def should_not_end_with(self, str1, str2, msg=None, values=True): """Fails if the string ``str1`` ends with the string ``str2``. See `Should Be Equal` for an explanation on how to override the default error message with ``msg`` and ``values``. """ if str1.endswith(str2): raise AssertionError(self._get_string_msg(str1, str2, msg, values, 'ends with')) def should_end_with(self, str1, str2, msg=None, values=True): """Fails if the string ``str1`` does not end with the string ``str2``. See `Should Be Equal` for an explanation on how to override the default error message with ``msg`` and ``values``. """ if not str1.endswith(str2): raise AssertionError(self._get_string_msg(str1, str2, msg, values, 'does not end with')) def should_not_contain(self, container, item, msg=None, values=True): """Fails if ``container`` contains ``item`` one or more times. Works with strings, lists, and anything that supports Python's ``in`` operator. See `Should Be Equal` for an explanation on how to override the default error message with ``msg`` and ``values``. Examples: | Should Not Contain | ${output} | FAILED | | Should Not Contain | ${some list} | value | """ if item in container: raise AssertionError(self._get_string_msg(container, item, msg, values, 'contains')) def should_contain(self, container, item, msg=None, values=True): """Fails if ``container`` does not contain ``item`` one or more times. Works with strings, lists, and anything that supports Python's ``in`` operator. See `Should Be Equal` for an explanation on how to override the default error message with ``msg`` and ``values``. Examples: | Should Contain | ${output} | PASS | | Should Contain | ${some list} | value | """ if item not in container: raise AssertionError(self._get_string_msg(container, item, msg, values, 'does not contain')) def should_contain_x_times(self, item1, item2, count, msg=None): """Fails if ``item1`` does not contain ``item2`` ``count`` times. Works with strings, lists and all objects that `Get Count` works with. The default error message can be overridden with ``msg`` and the actual count is always logged. Examples: | Should Contain X Times | ${output} | hello | 2 | | Should Contain X Times | ${some list} | value | 3 | """ count = self._convert_to_integer(count) x = self.get_count(item1, item2) if not msg: msg = "'%s' contains '%s' %d time%s, not %d time%s." \ % (unic(item1), unic(item2), x, s(x), count, s(count)) self.should_be_equal_as_integers(x, count, msg, values=False) def get_count(self, item1, item2): """Returns and logs how many times ``item2`` is found from ``item1``. This keyword works with Python strings and lists and all objects that either have ``count`` method or can be converted to Python lists. Example: | ${count} = | Get Count | ${some item} | interesting value | | Should Be True | 5 < ${count} < 10 | """ if not hasattr(item1, 'count'): try: item1 = list(item1) except: raise RuntimeError("Converting '%s' to list failed: %s" % (item1, get_error_message())) count = item1.count(item2) self.log('Item found from the first item %d time%s' % (count, s(count))) return count def should_not_match(self, string, pattern, msg=None, values=True): """Fails if the given ``string`` matches the given ``pattern``. Pattern matching is similar as matching files in a shell, and it is always case-sensitive. In the pattern ``*`` matches to anything and ``?`` matches to any single character. See `Should Be Equal` for an explanation on how to override the default error message with ``msg`` and ``values``. """ if self._matches(string, pattern): raise AssertionError(self._get_string_msg(string, pattern, msg, values, 'matches')) def should_match(self, string, pattern, msg=None, values=True): """Fails unless the given ``string`` matches the given ``pattern``. Pattern matching is similar as matching files in a shell, and it is always case-sensitive. In the pattern, ``*`` matches to anything and ``?`` matches to any single character. See `Should Be Equal` for an explanation on how to override the default error message with ``msg`` and ``values``. """ if not self._matches(string, pattern): raise AssertionError(self._get_string_msg(string, pattern, msg, values, 'does not match')) def should_match_regexp(self, string, pattern, msg=None, values=True): """Fails if ``string`` does not match ``pattern`` as a regular expression. Regular expression check is implemented using the Python [http://docs.python.org/2/library/re.html|re module]. Python's regular expression syntax is derived from Perl, and it is thus also very similar to the syntax used, for example, in Java, Ruby and .NET. Things to note about the regexp syntax in Robot Framework test data: 1) Backslash is an escape character in the test data, and possible backslashes in the pattern must thus be escaped with another backslash (e.g. ``\\\\d\\\\w+``). 2) Strings that may contain special characters, but should be handled as literal strings, can be escaped with the `Regexp Escape` keyword. 3) The given pattern does not need to match the whole string. For example, the pattern ``ello`` matches the string ``Hello world!``. If a full match is needed, the ``^`` and ``$`` characters can be used to denote the beginning and end of the string, respectively. For example, ``^ello$`` only matches the exact string ``ello``. 4) Possible flags altering how the expression is parsed (e.g. ``re.IGNORECASE``, ``re.MULTILINE``) can be set by prefixing the pattern with the ``(?iLmsux)`` group like ``(?im)pattern``. The available flags are ``i`` (case-insensitive), ``m`` (multiline mode), ``s`` (dotall mode), ``x`` (verbose), ``u`` (Unicode dependent) and ``L`` (locale dependent). If this keyword passes, it returns the portion of the string that matched the pattern. Additionally, the possible captured groups are returned. See the `Should Be Equal` keyword for an explanation on how to override the default error message with the ``msg`` and ``values`` arguments. Examples: | Should Match Regexp | ${output} | \\\\d{6} | # Output contains six numbers | | Should Match Regexp | ${output} | ^\\\\d{6}$ | # Six numbers and nothing more | | ${ret} = | Should Match Regexp | Foo: 42 | (?i)foo: \\\\d+ | | ${match} | ${group1} | ${group2} = | | ... | Should Match Regexp | Bar: 43 | (Foo|Bar): (\\\\d+) | => | ${ret} = 'Foo: 42' | ${match} = 'Bar: 43' | ${group1} = 'Bar' | ${group2} = '43' """ res = re.search(pattern, string) if res is None: raise AssertionError(self._get_string_msg(string, pattern, msg, values, 'does not match')) match = res.group(0) groups = res.groups() if groups: return [match] + list(groups) return match def should_not_match_regexp(self, string, pattern, msg=None, values=True): """Fails if ``string`` matches ``pattern`` as a regular expression. See `Should Match Regexp` for more information about arguments. """ if re.search(pattern, string) is not None: raise AssertionError(self._get_string_msg(string, pattern, msg, values, 'matches')) def get_length(self, item): """Returns and logs the length of the given item as an integer. The item can be anything that has a length, for example, a string, a list, or a mapping. The keyword first tries to get the length with the Python function ``len``, which calls the item's ``__len__`` method internally. If that fails, the keyword tries to call the item's possible ``length`` and ``size`` methods directly. The final attempt is trying to get the value of the item's ``length`` attribute. If all these attempts are unsuccessful, the keyword fails. Examples: | ${length} = | Get Length | Hello, world! | | | Should Be Equal As Integers | ${length} | 13 | | @{list} = | Create List | Hello, | world! | | ${length} = | Get Length | ${list} | | | Should Be Equal As Integers | ${length} | 2 | See also `Length Should Be`, `Should Be Empty` and `Should Not Be Empty`. """ length = self._get_length(item) self.log('Length is %d' % length) return length def _get_length(self, item): try: return len(item) except RERAISED_EXCEPTIONS: raise except: try: return item.length() except RERAISED_EXCEPTIONS: raise except: try: return item.size() except RERAISED_EXCEPTIONS: raise except: try: return item.length except RERAISED_EXCEPTIONS: raise except: raise RuntimeError("Could not get length of '%s'." % item) def length_should_be(self, item, length, msg=None): """Verifies that the length of the given item is correct. The length of the item is got using the `Get Length` keyword. The default error message can be overridden with the ``msg`` argument. """ length = self._convert_to_integer(length) actual = self.get_length(item) if actual != length: raise AssertionError(msg or "Length of '%s' should be %d but is %d." % (item, length, actual)) def should_be_empty(self, item, msg=None): """Verifies that the given item is empty. The length of the item is got using the `Get Length` keyword. The default error message can be overridden with the ``msg`` argument. """ if self.get_length(item) > 0: raise AssertionError(msg or "'%s' should be empty." % item) def should_not_be_empty(self, item, msg=None): """Verifies that the given item is not empty. The length of the item is got using the `Get Length` keyword. The default error message can be overridden with the ``msg`` argument. """ if self.get_length(item) == 0: raise AssertionError(msg or "'%s' should not be empty." % item) def _get_string_msg(self, str1, str2, msg, values, delim): default = "'%s' %s '%s'" % (unic(str1), delim, unic(str2)) if not msg: msg = default elif self._include_values(values): msg = '%s: %s' % (msg, default) return msg class _Variables(_BuiltInBase): def get_variables(self, no_decoration=False): """Returns a dictionary containing all variables in the current scope. Variables are returned as a special dictionary that allows accessing variables in space, case, and underscore insensitive manner similarly as accessing variables in the test data. This dictionary supports all same operations as normal Python dictionaries and, for example, Collections library can be used to access or modify it. Modifying the returned dictionary has no effect on the variables available in the current scope. By default variables are returned with ``${}``, ``@{}`` or ``&{}`` decoration based on variable types. Giving a true value (see `Boolean arguments`) to the optional argument ``no_decoration`` will return the variables without the decoration. This option is new in Robot Framework 2.9. Example: | ${example_variable} = | Set Variable | example value | | ${variables} = | Get Variables | | | Dictionary Should Contain Key | ${variables} | \\${example_variable} | | Dictionary Should Contain Key | ${variables} | \\${ExampleVariable} | | Set To Dictionary | ${variables} | \\${name} | value | | Variable Should Not Exist | \\${name} | | | | ${no decoration} = | Get Variables | no_decoration=Yes | | Dictionary Should Contain Key | ${no decoration} | example_variable | Note: Prior to Robot Framework 2.7.4 variables were returned as a custom object that did not support all dictionary methods. """ return self._variables.as_dict(decoration=is_falsy(no_decoration)) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=0) def get_variable_value(self, name, default=None): """Returns variable value or ``default`` if the variable does not exist. The name of the variable can be given either as a normal variable name (e.g. ``${NAME}``) or in escaped format (e.g. ``\\${NAME}``). Notice that the former has some limitations explained in `Set Suite Variable`. Examples: | ${x} = | Get Variable Value | ${a} | default | | ${y} = | Get Variable Value | ${a} | ${b} | | ${z} = | Get Variable Value | ${z} | | => | ${x} gets value of ${a} if ${a} exists and string 'default' otherwise | ${y} gets value of ${a} if ${a} exists and value of ${b} otherwise | ${z} is set to Python None if it does not exist previously See `Set Variable If` for another keyword to set variables dynamically. """ try: return self._variables[self._get_var_name(name)] except DataError: return self._variables.replace_scalar(default) def log_variables(self, level='INFO'): """Logs all variables in the current scope with given log level.""" variables = self.get_variables() for name in sorted(variables, key=lambda s: s[2:-1].lower()): msg = format_assign_message(name, variables[name], cut_long=False) self.log(msg, level) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=0) def variable_should_exist(self, name, msg=None): """Fails unless the given variable exists within the current scope. The name of the variable can be given either as a normal variable name (e.g. ``${NAME}``) or in escaped format (e.g. ``\\${NAME}``). Notice that the former has some limitations explained in `Set Suite Variable`. The default error message can be overridden with the ``msg`` argument. See also `Variable Should Not Exist` and `Keyword Should Exist`. """ name = self._get_var_name(name) msg = self._variables.replace_string(msg) if msg \ else "Variable %s does not exist." % name try: self._variables[name] except DataError: raise AssertionError(msg) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=0) def variable_should_not_exist(self, name, msg=None): """Fails if the given variable exists within the current scope. The name of the variable can be given either as a normal variable name (e.g. ``${NAME}``) or in escaped format (e.g. ``\\${NAME}``). Notice that the former has some limitations explained in `Set Suite Variable`. The default error message can be overridden with the ``msg`` argument. See also `Variable Should Exist` and `Keyword Should Exist`. """ name = self._get_var_name(name) msg = self._variables.replace_string(msg) if msg \ else "Variable %s exists." % name try: self._variables[name] except DataError: pass else: raise AssertionError(msg) def replace_variables(self, text): """Replaces variables in the given text with their current values. If the text contains undefined variables, this keyword fails. If the given ``text`` contains only a single variable, its value is returned as-is and it can be any object. Otherwise this keyword always returns a string. Example: The file ``template.txt`` contains ``Hello ${NAME}!`` and variable ``${NAME}`` has the value ``Robot``. | ${template} = | Get File | ${CURDIR}/template.txt | | ${message} = | Replace Variables | ${template} | | Should Be Equal | ${message} | Hello Robot! | """ return self._variables.replace_scalar(text) def set_variable(self, *values): """Returns the given values which can then be assigned to a variables. This keyword is mainly used for setting scalar variables. Additionally it can be used for converting a scalar variable containing a list to a list variable or to multiple scalar variables. It is recommended to use `Create List` when creating new lists. Examples: | ${hi} = | Set Variable | Hello, world! | | ${hi2} = | Set Variable | I said: ${hi} | | ${var1} | ${var2} = | Set Variable | Hello | world | | @{list} = | Set Variable | ${list with some items} | | ${item1} | ${item2} = | Set Variable | ${list with 2 items} | Variables created with this keyword are available only in the scope where they are created. See `Set Global Variable`, `Set Test Variable` and `Set Suite Variable` for information on how to set variables so that they are available also in a larger scope. """ if len(values) == 0: return '' elif len(values) == 1: return values[0] else: return list(values) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=0) def set_test_variable(self, name, *values): """Makes a variable available everywhere within the scope of the current test. Variables set with this keyword are available everywhere within the scope of the currently executed test case. For example, if you set a variable in a user keyword, it is available both in the test case level and also in all other user keywords used in the current test. Other test cases will not see variables set with this keyword. See `Set Suite Variable` for more information and examples. """ name = self._get_var_name(name) value = self._get_var_value(name, values) self._variables.set_test(name, value) self._log_set_variable(name, value) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=0) def set_suite_variable(self, name, *values): """Makes a variable available everywhere within the scope of the current suite. Variables set with this keyword are available everywhere within the scope of the currently executed test suite. Setting variables with this keyword thus has the same effect as creating them using the Variable table in the test data file or importing them from variable files. Possible child test suites do not see variables set with this keyword by default. Starting from Robot Framework 2.9, that can be controlled by using ``children=<option>`` as the last argument. If the specified ``<option>`` is a non-empty string or any other value considered true in Python, the variable is set also to the child suites. Parent and sibling suites will never see variables set with this keyword. The name of the variable can be given either as a normal variable name (e.g. ``${NAME}``) or in escaped format as ``\\${NAME}`` or ``$NAME``. Variable value can be given using the same syntax as when variables are created in the Variable table. If a variable already exists within the new scope, its value will be overwritten. Otherwise a new variable is created. If a variable already exists within the current scope, the value can be left empty and the variable within the new scope gets the value within the current scope. Examples: | Set Suite Variable | ${SCALAR} | Hello, world! | | Set Suite Variable | ${SCALAR} | Hello, world! | children=true | | Set Suite Variable | @{LIST} | First item | Second item | | Set Suite Variable | &{DICT} | key=value | foo=bar | | ${ID} = | Get ID | | Set Suite Variable | ${ID} | To override an existing value with an empty value, use built-in variables ``${EMPTY}``, ``@{EMPTY}`` or ``&{EMPTY}``: | Set Suite Variable | ${SCALAR} | ${EMPTY} | | Set Suite Variable | @{LIST} | @{EMPTY} | # New in RF 2.7.4 | | Set Suite Variable | &{DICT} | &{EMPTY} | # New in RF 2.9 | *NOTE:* If the variable has value which itself is a variable (escaped or not), you must always use the escaped format to set the variable: Example: | ${NAME} = | Set Variable | \\${var} | | Set Suite Variable | ${NAME} | value | # Sets variable ${var} | | Set Suite Variable | \\${NAME} | value | # Sets variable ${NAME} | This limitation applies also to `Set Test Variable`, `Set Global Variable`, `Variable Should Exist`, `Variable Should Not Exist` and `Get Variable Value` keywords. """ name = self._get_var_name(name) if (values and is_string(values[-1]) and values[-1].startswith('children=')): children = self._variables.replace_scalar(values[-1][9:]) children = is_truthy(children) values = values[:-1] else: children = False value = self._get_var_value(name, values) self._variables.set_suite(name, value, children=children) self._log_set_variable(name, value) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=0) def set_global_variable(self, name, *values): """Makes a variable available globally in all tests and suites. Variables set with this keyword are globally available in all test cases and suites executed after setting them. Setting variables with this keyword thus has the same effect as creating from the command line using the options ``--variable`` or ``--variablefile``. Because this keyword can change variables everywhere, it should be used with care. See `Set Suite Variable` for more information and examples. """ name = self._get_var_name(name) value = self._get_var_value(name, values) self._variables.set_global(name, value) self._log_set_variable(name, value) # Helpers def _get_var_name(self, orig): name = self._resolve_possible_variable(orig) try: return self._unescape_variable_if_needed(name) except ValueError: raise RuntimeError("Invalid variable syntax '%s'." % orig) def _resolve_possible_variable(self, name): try: resolved = self._variables.replace_string(name) return self._unescape_variable_if_needed(resolved) except (KeyError, ValueError, DataError): return name def _unescape_variable_if_needed(self, name): if name.startswith('\\'): name = name[1:] if len(name) < 2: raise ValueError if name[0] in '$@&' and name[1] != '{': name = '%s{%s}' % (name[0], name[1:]) if is_var(name): return name # Support for possible internal variables (issue 397) name = '%s{%s}' % (name[0], self.replace_variables(name[2:-1])) if is_var(name): return name raise ValueError def _get_var_value(self, name, values): if not values: return self._variables[name] if name[0] == '$': # We could consider catenating values similarly as when creating # scalar variables in the variable table, but that would require # handling non-string values somehow. For details see # https://github.com/robotframework/robotframework/issues/1919 if len(values) != 1 or VariableSplitter(values[0]).is_list_variable(): raise DataError("Setting list value to scalar variable '%s' " "is not supported anymore. Create list " "variable '@%s' instead." % (name, name[1:])) return self._variables.replace_scalar(values[0]) return VariableTableValue(values, name).resolve(self._variables) def _log_set_variable(self, name, value): self.log(format_assign_message(name, value)) class _RunKeyword(_BuiltInBase): # If you use any of these run keyword variants from another library, you # should register those keywords with 'register_run_keyword' method. See # the documentation of that method at the end of this file. There are also # other run keyword variant keywords in BuiltIn which can also be seen # at the end of this file. @run_keyword_variant(resolve=1) def run_keyword(self, name, *args): """Executes the given keyword with the given arguments. Because the name of the keyword to execute is given as an argument, it can be a variable and thus set dynamically, e.g. from a return value of another keyword or from the command line. """ if not is_string(name): raise RuntimeError('Keyword name must be a string.') kw = Keyword(name, args=args) return kw.run(self._context) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=0) def run_keywords(self, *keywords): """Executes all the given keywords in a sequence. This keyword is mainly useful in setups and teardowns when they need to take care of multiple actions and creating a new higher level user keyword would be an overkill. By default all arguments are expected to be keywords to be executed. Examples: | Run Keywords | Initialize database | Start servers | Clear logs | | Run Keywords | ${KW 1} | ${KW 2} | | Run Keywords | @{KEYWORDS} | Starting from Robot Framework 2.7.6, keywords can also be run with arguments using upper case ``AND`` as a separator between keywords. The keywords are executed so that the first argument is the first keyword and proceeding arguments until the first ``AND`` are arguments to it. First argument after the first ``AND`` is the second keyword and proceeding arguments until the next ``AND`` are its arguments. And so on. Examples: | Run Keywords | Initialize database | db1 | AND | Start servers | server1 | server2 | | Run Keywords | Initialize database | ${DB NAME} | AND | Start servers | @{SERVERS} | AND | Clear logs | | Run Keywords | ${KW} | AND | @{KW WITH ARGS} | Notice that the ``AND`` control argument must be used explicitly and cannot itself come from a variable. If you need to use literal ``AND`` string as argument, you can either use variables or escape it with a backslash like ``\\AND``. """ self._run_keywords(self._split_run_keywords(list(keywords))) def _run_keywords(self, iterable): errors = [] for kw, args in iterable: try: self.run_keyword(kw, *args) except ExecutionPassed as err: err.set_earlier_failures(errors) raise err except ExecutionFailed as err: errors.extend(err.get_errors()) if not err.can_continue(self._context.in_teardown): break if errors: raise ExecutionFailures(errors) def _split_run_keywords(self, keywords): if 'AND' not in keywords: for name in self._variables.replace_list(keywords): yield name, () else: for name, args in self._split_run_keywords_from_and(keywords): yield name, args def _split_run_keywords_from_and(self, keywords): while 'AND' in keywords: index = keywords.index('AND') yield self._resolve_run_keywords_name_and_args(keywords[:index]) keywords = keywords[index+1:] yield self._resolve_run_keywords_name_and_args(keywords) def _resolve_run_keywords_name_and_args(self, kw_call): kw_call = self._variables.replace_list(kw_call, replace_until=1) if not kw_call: raise DataError('Incorrect use of AND') return kw_call[0], kw_call[1:] @run_keyword_variant(resolve=2) def run_keyword_if(self, condition, name, *args): """Runs the given keyword with the given arguments, if ``condition`` is true. The given ``condition`` is evaluated in Python as explained in `Evaluating expressions`, and ``name`` and ``*args`` have same semantics as with `Run Keyword`. Example, a simple if/else construct: | ${status} | ${value} = | `Run Keyword And Ignore Error` | `My Keyword` | | `Run Keyword If` | '${status}' == 'PASS' | `Some Action` | arg | | `Run Keyword Unless` | '${status}' == 'PASS' | `Another Action` | In this example, only either `Some Action` or `Another Action` is executed, based on the status of `My Keyword`. Instead of `Run Keyword And Ignore Error` you can also use `Run Keyword And Return Status`. Variables used like ``${variable}``, as in the examples above, are replaced in the expression before evaluation. Variables are also available in the evaluation namespace and can be accessed using special syntax ``$variable``. This is a new feature in Robot Framework 2.9 and it is explained more thoroughly in `Evaluating expressions`. Example: | `Run Keyword If` | $result is None or $result == 'FAIL' | `Keyword` | Starting from Robot version 2.7.4, this keyword supports also optional ELSE and ELSE IF branches. Both of these are defined in ``*args`` and must use exactly format ``ELSE`` or ``ELSE IF``, respectively. ELSE branches must contain first the name of the keyword to execute and then its possible arguments. ELSE IF branches must first contain a condition, like the first argument to this keyword, and then the keyword to execute and its possible arguments. It is possible to have ELSE branch after ELSE IF and to have multiple ELSE IF branches. Given previous example, if/else construct can also be created like this: | ${status} | ${value} = | `Run Keyword And Ignore Error` | My Keyword | | `Run Keyword If` | '${status}' == 'PASS' | `Some Action` | arg | ELSE | `Another Action` | The return value is the one of the keyword that was executed or None if no keyword was executed (i.e. if ``condition`` was false). Hence, it is recommended to use ELSE and/or ELSE IF branches to conditionally assign return values from keyword to variables (to conditionally assign fixed values to variables, see `Set Variable If`). This is illustrated by the example below: | ${var1} = | `Run Keyword If` | ${rc} == 0 | `Some keyword returning a value` | | ... | ELSE IF | 0 < ${rc} < 42 | `Another keyword` | | ... | ELSE IF | ${rc} < 0 | `Another keyword with args` | ${rc} | arg2 | | ... | ELSE | `Final keyword to handle abnormal cases` | ${rc} | | ${var2} = | `Run Keyword If` | ${condition} | `Some keyword` | In this example, ${var2} will be set to None if ${condition} is false. Notice that ``ELSE`` and ``ELSE IF`` control words must be used explicitly and thus cannot come from variables. If you need to use literal ``ELSE`` and ``ELSE IF`` strings as arguments, you can escape them with a backslash like ``\\ELSE`` and ``\\ELSE IF``. Starting from Robot Framework 2.8, Python's [http://docs.python.org/2/library/os.html|os] and [http://docs.python.org/2/library/sys.html|sys] modules are automatically imported when evaluating the ``condition``. Attributes they contain can thus be used in the condition: | `Run Keyword If` | os.sep == '/' | `Unix Keyword` | | ... | ELSE IF | sys.platform.startswith('java') | `Jython Keyword` | | ... | ELSE | `Windows Keyword` | """ args, branch = self._split_elif_or_else_branch(args) if self._is_true(condition): return self.run_keyword(name, *args) return branch() def _split_elif_or_else_branch(self, args): if 'ELSE IF' in args: args, branch = self._split_branch(args, 'ELSE IF', 2, 'condition and keyword') return args, lambda: self.run_keyword_if(*branch) if 'ELSE' in args: args, branch = self._split_branch(args, 'ELSE', 1, 'keyword') return args, lambda: self.run_keyword(*branch) return args, lambda: None def _split_branch(self, args, control_word, required, required_error): index = list(args).index(control_word) branch = self._variables.replace_list(args[index+1:], required) if len(branch) < required: raise DataError('%s requires %s.' % (control_word, required_error)) return args[:index], branch @run_keyword_variant(resolve=2) def run_keyword_unless(self, condition, name, *args): """Runs the given keyword with the given arguments, if ``condition`` is false. See `Run Keyword If` for more information and an example. """ if not self._is_true(condition): return self.run_keyword(name, *args) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=1) def run_keyword_and_ignore_error(self, name, *args): """Runs the given keyword with the given arguments and ignores possible error. This keyword returns two values, so that the first is either string ``PASS`` or ``FAIL``, depending on the status of the executed keyword. The second value is either the return value of the keyword or the received error message. See `Run Keyword And Return Status` If you are only interested in the execution status. The keyword name and arguments work as in `Run Keyword`. See `Run Keyword If` for a usage example. Errors caused by invalid syntax, timeouts, or fatal exceptions are not caught by this keyword. Otherwise this keyword itself never fails. Since Robot Framework 2.9, variable errors are caught by this keyword. """ try: return 'PASS', self.run_keyword(name, *args) except ExecutionFailed as err: if err.dont_continue: raise return 'FAIL', unic(err) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=1) def run_keyword_and_return_status(self, name, *args): """Runs the given keyword with given arguments and returns the status as a Boolean value. This keyword returns Boolean ``True`` if the keyword that is executed succeeds and ``False`` if it fails. This is useful, for example, in combination with `Run Keyword If`. If you are interested in the error message or return value, use `Run Keyword And Ignore Error` instead. The keyword name and arguments work as in `Run Keyword`. Example: | ${passed} = | `Run Keyword And Return Status` | Keyword | args | | `Run Keyword If` | ${passed} | Another keyword | Errors caused by invalid syntax, timeouts, or fatal exceptions are not caught by this keyword. Otherwise this keyword itself never fails. New in Robot Framework 2.7.6. """ status, _ = self.run_keyword_and_ignore_error(name, *args) return status == 'PASS' @run_keyword_variant(resolve=1) def run_keyword_and_continue_on_failure(self, name, *args): """Runs the keyword and continues execution even if a failure occurs. The keyword name and arguments work as with `Run Keyword`. Example: | Run Keyword And Continue On Failure | Fail | This is a stupid example | | Log | This keyword is executed | The execution is not continued if the failure is caused by invalid syntax, timeout, or fatal exception. Since Robot Framework 2.9, variable errors are caught by this keyword. """ try: return self.run_keyword(name, *args) except ExecutionFailed as err: if not err.dont_continue: err.continue_on_failure = True raise err @run_keyword_variant(resolve=2) def run_keyword_and_expect_error(self, expected_error, name, *args): """Runs the keyword and checks that the expected error occurred. The expected error must be given in the same format as in Robot Framework reports. It can be a pattern containing characters ``?``, which matches to any single character and ``*``, which matches to any number of any characters. ``name`` and ``*args`` have same semantics as with `Run Keyword`. If the expected error occurs, the error message is returned and it can be further processed/tested, if needed. If there is no error, or the error does not match the expected error, this keyword fails. Examples: | Run Keyword And Expect Error | My error | Some Keyword | arg1 | arg2 | | ${msg} = | Run Keyword And Expect Error | * | My KW | | Should Start With | ${msg} | Once upon a time in | Errors caused by invalid syntax, timeouts, or fatal exceptions are not caught by this keyword. Since Robot Framework 2.9, variable errors are caught by this keyword. """ try: self.run_keyword(name, *args) except ExecutionFailed as err: if err.dont_continue: raise error = err else: raise AssertionError("Expected error '%s' did not occur." % expected_error) if not self._matches(unic(error), expected_error): raise AssertionError("Expected error '%s' but got '%s'." % (expected_error, error)) return unic(error) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=2) def repeat_keyword(self, repeat, name, *args): """Executes the specified keyword multiple times. ``name`` and ``args`` define the keyword that is executed similarly as with `Run Keyword`. ``repeat`` specifies how many times (as a count) or how long time (as a timeout) the keyword should be executed. If ``repeat`` is given as count, it specifies how many times the keyword should be executed. ``repeat`` can be given as an integer or as a string that can be converted to an integer. If it is a string, it can have postfix ``times`` or ``x`` (case and space insensitive) to make the expression more explicit. If ``repeat`` is given as timeout, it must be in Robot Framework's time format (e.g. ``1 minute``, ``2 min 3 s``). Using a number alone (e.g. ``1`` or ``1.5``) does not work in this context. If ``repeat`` is zero or negative, the keyword is not executed at all. This keyword fails immediately if any of the execution rounds fails. Examples: | Repeat Keyword | 5 times | Go to Previous Page | | Repeat Keyword | ${var} | Some Keyword | arg1 | arg2 | | Repeat Keyword | 2 minutes | Some Keyword | arg1 | arg2 | Specifying ``repeat`` as a timeout is new in Robot Framework 3.0. """ try: count = self._get_repeat_count(repeat) except RuntimeError as err: timeout = self._get_repeat_timeout(repeat) if timeout is None: raise err keywords = self._keywords_repeated_by_timeout(timeout, name, args) else: keywords = self._keywords_repeated_by_count(count, name, args) self._run_keywords(keywords) def _get_repeat_count(self, times, require_postfix=False): times = normalize(str(times)) if times.endswith('times'): times = times[:-5] elif times.endswith('x'): times = times[:-1] elif require_postfix: raise ValueError return self._convert_to_integer(times) def _get_repeat_timeout(self, timestr): try: float(timestr) except ValueError: pass else: return None try: return timestr_to_secs(timestr) except ValueError: return None def _keywords_repeated_by_count(self, count, name, args): if count <= 0: self.log("Keyword '%s' repeated zero times." % name) for i in range(count): self.log("Repeating keyword, round %d/%d." % (i + 1, count)) yield name, args def _keywords_repeated_by_timeout(self, timeout, name, args): if timeout <= 0: self.log("Keyword '%s' repeated zero times." % name) repeat_round = 0 maxtime = time.time() + timeout while time.time() < maxtime: repeat_round += 1 self.log("Repeating keyword, round %d, %s remaining." % (repeat_round, secs_to_timestr(maxtime - time.time(), compact=True))) yield name, args @run_keyword_variant(resolve=3) def wait_until_keyword_succeeds(self, retry, retry_interval, name, *args): """Runs the specified keyword and retries if it fails. ``name`` and ``args`` define the keyword that is executed similarly as with `Run Keyword`. How long to retry running the keyword is defined using ``retry`` argument either as timeout or count. ``retry_interval`` is the time to wait before trying to run the keyword again after the previous run has failed. If ``retry`` is given as timeout, it must be in Robot Framework's time format (e.g. ``1 minute``, ``2 min 3 s``, ``4.5``) that is explained in an appendix of Robot Framework User Guide. If it is given as count, it must have ``times`` or ``x`` postfix (e.g. ``5 times``, ``10 x``). ``retry_interval`` must always be given in Robot Framework's time format. If the keyword does not succeed regardless of retries, this keyword fails. If the executed keyword passes, its return value is returned. Examples: | Wait Until Keyword Succeeds | 2 min | 5 sec | My keyword | argument | | ${result} = | Wait Until Keyword Succeeds | 3x | 200ms | My keyword | All normal failures are caught by this keyword. Errors caused by invalid syntax, test or keyword timeouts, or fatal exceptions (caused e.g. by `Fatal Error`) are not caught. Running the same keyword multiple times inside this keyword can create lots of output and considerably increase the size of the generated output files. Starting from Robot Framework 2.7, it is possible to remove unnecessary keywords from the outputs using ``--RemoveKeywords WUKS`` command line option. Support for specifying ``retry`` as a number of times to retry is a new feature in Robot Framework 2.9. Since Robot Framework 2.9, variable errors are caught by this keyword. """ maxtime = count = -1 try: count = self._get_repeat_count(retry, require_postfix=True) except ValueError: timeout = timestr_to_secs(retry) maxtime = time.time() + timeout message = 'for %s' % secs_to_timestr(timeout) else: if count <= 0: raise ValueError('Retry count %d is not positive.' % count) message = '%d time%s' % (count, s(count)) retry_interval = timestr_to_secs(retry_interval) while True: try: return self.run_keyword(name, *args) except ExecutionFailed as err: if err.dont_continue: raise count -= 1 if time.time() > maxtime > 0 or count == 0: raise AssertionError("Keyword '%s' failed after retrying " "%s. The last error was: %s" % (name, message, err)) self._sleep_in_parts(retry_interval) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=1) def set_variable_if(self, condition, *values): """Sets variable based on the given condition. The basic usage is giving a condition and two values. The given condition is first evaluated the same way as with the `Should Be True` keyword. If the condition is true, then the first value is returned, and otherwise the second value is returned. The second value can also be omitted, in which case it has a default value None. This usage is illustrated in the examples below, where ``${rc}`` is assumed to be zero. | ${var1} = | Set Variable If | ${rc} == 0 | zero | nonzero | | ${var2} = | Set Variable If | ${rc} > 0 | value1 | value2 | | ${var3} = | Set Variable If | ${rc} > 0 | whatever | | => | ${var1} = 'zero' | ${var2} = 'value2' | ${var3} = None It is also possible to have 'else if' support by replacing the second value with another condition, and having two new values after it. If the first condition is not true, the second is evaluated and one of the values after it is returned based on its truth value. This can be continued by adding more conditions without a limit. | ${var} = | Set Variable If | ${rc} == 0 | zero | | ... | ${rc} > 0 | greater than zero | less then zero | | | | ${var} = | Set Variable If | | ... | ${rc} == 0 | zero | | ... | ${rc} == 1 | one | | ... | ${rc} == 2 | two | | ... | ${rc} > 2 | greater than two | | ... | ${rc} < 0 | less than zero | Use `Get Variable Value` if you need to set variables dynamically based on whether a variable exist or not. """ values = self._verify_values_for_set_variable_if(list(values)) if self._is_true(condition): return self._variables.replace_scalar(values[0]) values = self._verify_values_for_set_variable_if(values[1:], True) if len(values) == 1: return self._variables.replace_scalar(values[0]) return self.run_keyword('BuiltIn.Set Variable If', *values[0:]) def _verify_values_for_set_variable_if(self, values, default=False): if not values: if default: return [None] raise RuntimeError('At least one value is required') if is_list_var(values[0]): values[:1] = [escape(item) for item in self._variables[values[0]]] return self._verify_values_for_set_variable_if(values) return values @run_keyword_variant(resolve=1) def run_keyword_if_test_failed(self, name, *args): """Runs the given keyword with the given arguments, if the test failed. This keyword can only be used in a test teardown. Trying to use it anywhere else results in an error. Otherwise, this keyword works exactly like `Run Keyword`, see its documentation for more details. Prior to Robot Framework 2.9 failures in test teardown itself were not detected by this keyword. """ test = self._get_test_in_teardown('Run Keyword If Test Failed') if not test.passed: return self.run_keyword(name, *args) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=1) def run_keyword_if_test_passed(self, name, *args): """Runs the given keyword with the given arguments, if the test passed. This keyword can only be used in a test teardown. Trying to use it anywhere else results in an error. Otherwise, this keyword works exactly like `Run Keyword`, see its documentation for more details. Prior to Robot Framework 2.9 failures in test teardown itself were not detected by this keyword. """ test = self._get_test_in_teardown('Run Keyword If Test Passed') if test.passed: return self.run_keyword(name, *args) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=1) def run_keyword_if_timeout_occurred(self, name, *args): """Runs the given keyword if either a test or a keyword timeout has occurred. This keyword can only be used in a test teardown. Trying to use it anywhere else results in an error. Otherwise, this keyword works exactly like `Run Keyword`, see its documentation for more details. """ self._get_test_in_teardown('Run Keyword If Timeout Occurred') if self._context.timeout_occurred: return self.run_keyword(name, *args) def _get_test_in_teardown(self, kwname): ctx = self._context if ctx.test and ctx.in_test_teardown: return ctx.test raise RuntimeError("Keyword '%s' can only be used in test teardown." % kwname) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=1) def run_keyword_if_all_critical_tests_passed(self, name, *args): """Runs the given keyword with the given arguments, if all critical tests passed. This keyword can only be used in suite teardown. Trying to use it in any other place will result in an error. Otherwise, this keyword works exactly like `Run Keyword`, see its documentation for more details. """ suite = self._get_suite_in_teardown('Run Keyword If ' 'All Critical Tests Passed') if suite.statistics.critical.failed == 0: return self.run_keyword(name, *args) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=1) def run_keyword_if_any_critical_tests_failed(self, name, *args): """Runs the given keyword with the given arguments, if any critical tests failed. This keyword can only be used in a suite teardown. Trying to use it anywhere else results in an error. Otherwise, this keyword works exactly like `Run Keyword`, see its documentation for more details. """ suite = self._get_suite_in_teardown('Run Keyword If ' 'Any Critical Tests Failed') if suite.statistics.critical.failed > 0: return self.run_keyword(name, *args) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=1) def run_keyword_if_all_tests_passed(self, name, *args): """Runs the given keyword with the given arguments, if all tests passed. This keyword can only be used in a suite teardown. Trying to use it anywhere else results in an error. Otherwise, this keyword works exactly like `Run Keyword`, see its documentation for more details. """ suite = self._get_suite_in_teardown('Run Keyword If All Tests Passed') if suite.statistics.all.failed == 0: return self.run_keyword(name, *args) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=1) def run_keyword_if_any_tests_failed(self, name, *args): """Runs the given keyword with the given arguments, if one or more tests failed. This keyword can only be used in a suite teardown. Trying to use it anywhere else results in an error. Otherwise, this keyword works exactly like `Run Keyword`, see its documentation for more details. """ suite = self._get_suite_in_teardown('Run Keyword If Any Tests Failed') if suite.statistics.all.failed > 0: return self.run_keyword(name, *args) def _get_suite_in_teardown(self, kwname): if not self._context.in_suite_teardown: raise RuntimeError("Keyword '%s' can only be used in suite teardown." % kwname) return self._context.suite class _Control(_BuiltInBase): def continue_for_loop(self): """Skips the current for loop iteration and continues from the next. Skips the remaining keywords in the current for loop iteration and continues from the next one. Can be used directly in a for loop or in a keyword that the loop uses. Example: | :FOR | ${var} | IN | @{VALUES} | | | Run Keyword If | '${var}' == 'CONTINUE' | Continue For Loop | | | Do Something | ${var} | See `Continue For Loop If` to conditionally continue a for loop without using `Run Keyword If` or other wrapper keywords. New in Robot Framework 2.8. """ self.log("Continuing for loop from the next iteration.") raise ContinueForLoop() def continue_for_loop_if(self, condition): """Skips the current for loop iteration if the ``condition`` is true. A wrapper for `Continue For Loop` to continue a for loop based on the given condition. The condition is evaluated using the same semantics as with `Should Be True` keyword. Example: | :FOR | ${var} | IN | @{VALUES} | | | Continue For Loop If | '${var}' == 'CONTINUE' | | | Do Something | ${var} | New in Robot Framework 2.8. """ if self._is_true(condition): self.continue_for_loop() def exit_for_loop(self): """Stops executing the enclosing for loop. Exits the enclosing for loop and continues execution after it. Can be used directly in a for loop or in a keyword that the loop uses. Example: | :FOR | ${var} | IN | @{VALUES} | | | Run Keyword If | '${var}' == 'EXIT' | Exit For Loop | | | Do Something | ${var} | See `Exit For Loop If` to conditionally exit a for loop without using `Run Keyword If` or other wrapper keywords. """ self.log("Exiting for loop altogether.") raise ExitForLoop() def exit_for_loop_if(self, condition): """Stops executing the enclosing for loop if the ``condition`` is true. A wrapper for `Exit For Loop` to exit a for loop based on the given condition. The condition is evaluated using the same semantics as with `Should Be True` keyword. Example: | :FOR | ${var} | IN | @{VALUES} | | | Exit For Loop If | '${var}' == 'EXIT' | | | Do Something | ${var} | New in Robot Framework 2.8. """ if self._is_true(condition): self.exit_for_loop() @run_keyword_variant(resolve=0) def return_from_keyword(self, *return_values): """Returns from the enclosing user keyword. This keyword can be used to return from a user keyword with PASS status without executing it fully. It is also possible to return values similarly as with the ``[Return]`` setting. For more detailed information about working with the return values, see the User Guide. This keyword is typically wrapped to some other keyword, such as `Run Keyword If` or `Run Keyword If Test Passed`, to return based on a condition: | Run Keyword If | ${rc} < 0 | Return From Keyword | | Run Keyword If Test Passed | Return From Keyword | It is possible to use this keyword to return from a keyword also inside a for loop. That, as well as returning values, is demonstrated by the `Find Index` keyword in the following somewhat advanced example. Notice that it is often a good idea to move this kind of complicated logic into a test library. | ***** Variables ***** | @{LIST} = foo baz | | ***** Test Cases ***** | Example | ${index} = Find Index baz @{LIST} | Should Be Equal ${index} ${1} | ${index} = Find Index non existing @{LIST} | Should Be Equal ${index} ${-1} | | ***** Keywords ***** | Find Index | [Arguments] ${element} @{items} | ${index} = Set Variable ${0} | :FOR ${item} IN @{items} | \\ Run Keyword If '${item}' == '${element}' Return From Keyword ${index} | \\ ${index} = Set Variable ${index + 1} | Return From Keyword ${-1} # Also [Return] would work here. The most common use case, returning based on an expression, can be accomplished directly with `Return From Keyword If`. Both of these keywords are new in Robot Framework 2.8. See also `Run Keyword And Return` and `Run Keyword And Return If`. """ self.log('Returning from the enclosing user keyword.') raise ReturnFromKeyword(return_values) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=1) def return_from_keyword_if(self, condition, *return_values): """Returns from the enclosing user keyword if ``condition`` is true. A wrapper for `Return From Keyword` to return based on the given condition. The condition is evaluated using the same semantics as with `Should Be True` keyword. Given the same example as in `Return From Keyword`, we can rewrite the `Find Index` keyword as follows: | ***** Keywords ***** | Find Index | [Arguments] ${element} @{items} | ${index} = Set Variable ${0} | :FOR ${item} IN @{items} | \\ Return From Keyword If '${item}' == '${element}' ${index} | \\ ${index} = Set Variable ${index + 1} | Return From Keyword ${-1} # Also [Return] would work here. See also `Run Keyword And Return` and `Run Keyword And Return If`. New in Robot Framework 2.8. """ if self._is_true(condition): self.return_from_keyword(*return_values) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=1) def run_keyword_and_return(self, name, *args): """Runs the specified keyword and returns from the enclosing user keyword. The keyword to execute is defined with ``name`` and ``*args`` exactly like with `Run Keyword`. After running the keyword, returns from the enclosing user keyword and passes possible return value from the executed keyword further. Returning from a keyword has exactly same semantics as with `Return From Keyword`. Example: | `Run Keyword And Return` | `My Keyword` | arg1 | arg2 | | # Above is equivalent to: | | ${result} = | `My Keyword` | arg1 | arg2 | | `Return From Keyword` | ${result} | | | Use `Run Keyword And Return If` if you want to run keyword and return based on a condition. New in Robot Framework 2.8.2. """ ret = self.run_keyword(name, *args) self.return_from_keyword(escape(ret)) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=2) def run_keyword_and_return_if(self, condition, name, *args): """Runs the specified keyword and returns from the enclosing user keyword. A wrapper for `Run Keyword And Return` to run and return based on the given ``condition``. The condition is evaluated using the same semantics as with `Should Be True` keyword. Example: | `Run Keyword And Return If` | ${rc} > 0 | `My Keyword` | arg1 | arg2 | | # Above is equivalent to: | | `Run Keyword If` | ${rc} > 0 | `Run Keyword And Return` | `My Keyword ` | arg1 | arg2 | Use `Return From Keyword If` if you want to return a certain value based on a condition. New in Robot Framework 2.8.2. """ if self._is_true(condition): self.run_keyword_and_return(name, *args) def pass_execution(self, message, *tags): """Skips rest of the current test, setup, or teardown with PASS status. This keyword can be used anywhere in the test data, but the place where used affects the behavior: - When used in any setup or teardown (suite, test or keyword), passes that setup or teardown. Possible keyword teardowns of the started keywords are executed. Does not affect execution or statuses otherwise. - When used in a test outside setup or teardown, passes that particular test case. Possible test and keyword teardowns are executed. Possible continuable failures before this keyword is used, as well as failures in executed teardowns, will fail the execution. It is mandatory to give a message explaining why execution was passed. By default the message is considered plain text, but starting it with ``*HTML*`` allows using HTML formatting. It is also possible to modify test tags passing tags after the message similarly as with `Fail` keyword. Tags starting with a hyphen (e.g. ``-regression``) are removed and others added. Tags are modified using `Set Tags` and `Remove Tags` internally, and the semantics setting and removing them are the same as with these keywords. Examples: | Pass Execution | All features available in this version tested. | | Pass Execution | Deprecated test. | deprecated | -regression | This keyword is typically wrapped to some other keyword, such as `Run Keyword If`, to pass based on a condition. The most common case can be handled also with `Pass Execution If`: | Run Keyword If | ${rc} < 0 | Pass Execution | Negative values are cool. | | Pass Execution If | ${rc} < 0 | Negative values are cool. | Passing execution in the middle of a test, setup or teardown should be used with care. In the worst case it leads to tests that skip all the parts that could actually uncover problems in the tested application. In cases where execution cannot continue do to external factors, it is often safer to fail the test case and make it non-critical. New in Robot Framework 2.8. """ message = message.strip() if not message: raise RuntimeError('Message cannot be empty.') self._set_and_remove_tags(tags) log_message, level = self._get_logged_test_message_and_level(message) self.log('Execution passed with message:\n%s' % log_message, level) raise PassExecution(message) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=1) def pass_execution_if(self, condition, message, *tags): """Conditionally skips rest of the current test, setup, or teardown with PASS status. A wrapper for `Pass Execution` to skip rest of the current test, setup or teardown based the given ``condition``. The condition is evaluated similarly as with `Should Be True` keyword, and ``message`` and ``*tags`` have same semantics as with `Pass Execution`. Example: | :FOR | ${var} | IN | @{VALUES} | | | Pass Execution If | '${var}' == 'EXPECTED' | Correct value was found | | | Do Something | ${var} | New in Robot Framework 2.8. """ if self._is_true(condition): message = self._variables.replace_string(message) tags = [self._variables.replace_string(tag) for tag in tags] self.pass_execution(message, *tags) class _Misc(_BuiltInBase): def no_operation(self): """Does absolutely nothing.""" def sleep(self, time_, reason=None): """Pauses the test executed for the given time. ``time`` may be either a number or a time string. Time strings are in a format such as ``1 day 2 hours 3 minutes 4 seconds 5milliseconds`` or ``1d 2h 3m 4s 5ms``, and they are fully explained in an appendix of Robot Framework User Guide. Optional `reason` can be used to explain why sleeping is necessary. Both the time slept and the reason are logged. Examples: | Sleep | 42 | | Sleep | 1.5 | | Sleep | 2 minutes 10 seconds | | Sleep | 10s | Wait for a reply | """ seconds = timestr_to_secs(time_) # Python hangs with negative values if seconds < 0: seconds = 0 self._sleep_in_parts(seconds) self.log('Slept %s' % secs_to_timestr(seconds)) if reason: self.log(reason) def _sleep_in_parts(self, seconds): # time.sleep can't be stopped in windows # to ensure that we can signal stop (with timeout) # split sleeping to small pieces endtime = time.time() + float(seconds) while True: remaining = endtime - time.time() if remaining <= 0: break time.sleep(min(remaining, 0.01)) def catenate(self, *items): """Catenates the given items together and returns the resulted string. By default, items are catenated with spaces, but if the first item contains the string ``SEPARATOR=<sep>``, the separator ``<sep>`` is used instead. Items are converted into strings when necessary. Examples: | ${str1} = | Catenate | Hello | world | | | ${str2} = | Catenate | SEPARATOR=--- | Hello | world | | ${str3} = | Catenate | SEPARATOR= | Hello | world | => | ${str1} = 'Hello world' | ${str2} = 'Hello---world' | ${str3} = 'Helloworld' """ if not items: return '' items = [unic(item) for item in items] if items[0].startswith('SEPARATOR='): sep = items[0][len('SEPARATOR='):] items = items[1:] else: sep = ' ' return sep.join(items) def log(self, message, level='INFO', html=False, console=False, repr=False): u"""Logs the given message with the given level. Valid levels are TRACE, DEBUG, INFO (default), HTML, WARN, and ERROR. Messages below the current active log level are ignored. See `Set Log Level` keyword and ``--loglevel`` command line option for more details about setting the level. Messages logged with the WARN or ERROR levels will be automatically visible also in the console and in the Test Execution Errors section in the log file. Logging can be configured using optional ``html``, ``console`` and ``repr`` arguments. They are off by default, but can be enabled by giving them a true value. See `Boolean arguments` section for more information about true and false values. If the ``html`` argument is given a true value, the message will be considered HTML and special characters such as ``<`` in it are not escaped. For example, logging ``<img src="image.png">`` creates an image when ``html`` is true, but otherwise the message is that exact string. An alternative to using the ``html`` argument is using the HTML pseudo log level. It logs the message as HTML using the INFO level. If the ``console`` argument is true, the message will be written to the console where test execution was started from in addition to the log file. This keyword always uses the standard output stream and adds a newline after the written message. Use `Log To Console` instead if either of these is undesirable, If the ``repr`` argument is true, the given item will be passed through a custom version of Python's ``pprint.pformat()`` function before logging it. This is useful, for example, when working with strings or bytes containing invisible characters, or when working with nested data structures. The custom version differs from the standard one so that it omits the ``u`` prefix from Unicode strings and adds ``b`` prefix to byte strings. Examples: | Log | Hello, world! | | | # Normal INFO message. | | Log | Warning, world! | WARN | | # Warning. | | Log | <b>Hello</b>, world! | html=yes | | # INFO message as HTML. | | Log | <b>Hello</b>, world! | HTML | | # Same as above. | | Log | <b>Hello</b>, world! | DEBUG | html=true | # DEBUG as HTML. | | Log | Hello, console! | console=yes | | # Log also to the console. | | Log | Hyv\xe4 \\x00 | repr=yes | | # Log ``'Hyv\\xe4 \\x00'``. | See `Log Many` if you want to log multiple messages in one go, and `Log To Console` if you only want to write to the console. Arguments ``html``, ``console``, and ``repr`` are new in Robot Framework 2.8.2. Pprint support when ``repr`` is used is new in Robot Framework 2.8.6, and it was changed to drop the ``u`` prefix and add the ``b`` prefix in Robot Framework 2.9. """ if is_truthy(repr): message = prepr(message, width=80) logger.write(message, level, is_truthy(html)) if is_truthy(console): logger.console(message) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=0) def log_many(self, *messages): """Logs the given messages as separate entries using the INFO level. Supports also logging list and dictionary variable items individually. Examples: | Log Many | Hello | ${var} | | Log Many | @{list} | &{dict} | See `Log` and `Log To Console` keywords if you want to use alternative log levels, use HTML, or log to the console. """ for msg in self._yield_logged_messages(messages): self.log(msg) def _yield_logged_messages(self, messages): for msg in messages: var = VariableSplitter(msg) value = self._variables.replace_scalar(msg) if var.is_list_variable(): for item in value: yield item elif var.is_dict_variable(): for name, value in value.items(): yield '%s=%s' % (name, value) else: yield value def log_to_console(self, message, stream='STDOUT', no_newline=False): """Logs the given message to the console. By default uses the standard output stream. Using the standard error stream is possibly by giving the ``stream`` argument value ``STDERR`` (case-insensitive). By default appends a newline to the logged message. This can be disabled by giving the ``no_newline`` argument a true value (see `Boolean arguments`). Examples: | Log To Console | Hello, console! | | | Log To Console | Hello, stderr! | STDERR | | Log To Console | Message starts here and is | no_newline=true | | Log To Console | continued without newline. | | This keyword does not log the message to the normal log file. Use `Log` keyword, possibly with argument ``console``, if that is desired. New in Robot Framework 2.8.2. """ logger.console(message, newline=is_falsy(no_newline), stream=stream) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=0) def comment(self, *messages): """Displays the given messages in the log file as keyword arguments. This keyword does nothing with the arguments it receives, but as they are visible in the log, this keyword can be used to display simple messages. Given arguments are ignored so thoroughly that they can even contain non-existing variables. If you are interested about variable values, you can use the `Log` or `Log Many` keywords. """ pass def set_log_level(self, level): """Sets the log threshold to the specified level and returns the old level. Messages below the level will not logged. The default logging level is INFO, but it can be overridden with the command line option ``--loglevel``. The available levels: TRACE, DEBUG, INFO (default), WARN, ERROR and NONE (no logging). """ try: old = self._context.output.set_log_level(level) except DataError as err: raise RuntimeError(unic(err)) self._namespace.variables.set_global('${LOG_LEVEL}', level.upper()) self.log('Log level changed from %s to %s.' % (old, level.upper())) return old def reload_library(self, name_or_instance): """Rechecks what keywords the specified library provides. Can be called explicitly in the test data or by a library itself when keywords it provides have changed. The library can be specified by its name or as the active instance of the library. The latter is especially useful if the library itself calls this keyword as a method. New in Robot Framework 2.9. """ library = self._namespace.reload_library(name_or_instance) self.log('Reloaded library %s with %s keywords.' % (library.name, len(library))) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=0) def import_library(self, name, *args): """Imports a library with the given name and optional arguments. This functionality allows dynamic importing of libraries while tests are running. That may be necessary, if the library itself is dynamic and not yet available when test data is processed. In a normal case, libraries should be imported using the Library setting in the Setting table. This keyword supports importing libraries both using library names and physical paths. When paths are used, they must be given in absolute format or found from [http://robotframework.org/robotframework/latest/RobotFrameworkUserGuide.html#pythonpath-jythonpath-and-ironpythonpath| search path]. Forward slashes can be used as path separators in all operating systems. It is possible to pass arguments to the imported library and also named argument syntax works if the library supports it. ``WITH NAME`` syntax can be used to give a custom name to the imported library. Examples: | Import Library | MyLibrary | | Import Library | ${CURDIR}/../Library.py | arg1 | named=arg2 | | Import Library | ${LIBRARIES}/Lib.java | arg | WITH NAME | JavaLib | """ try: self._namespace.import_library(name, list(args)) except DataError as err: raise RuntimeError(unic(err)) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=0) def import_variables(self, path, *args): """Imports a variable file with the given path and optional arguments. Variables imported with this keyword are set into the test suite scope similarly when importing them in the Setting table using the Variables setting. These variables override possible existing variables with the same names. This functionality can thus be used to import new variables, for example, for each test in a test suite. The given path must be absolute or found from [http://robotframework.org/robotframework/latest/RobotFrameworkUserGuide.html#pythonpath-jythonpath-and-ironpythonpath| search path]. Forward slashes can be used as path separator regardless the operating system. Examples: | Import Variables | ${CURDIR}/variables.py | | | | Import Variables | ${CURDIR}/../vars/env.py | arg1 | arg2 | | Import Variables | file_from_pythonpath.py | | | """ try: self._namespace.import_variables(path, list(args), overwrite=True) except DataError as err: raise RuntimeError(unic(err)) @run_keyword_variant(resolve=0) def import_resource(self, path): """Imports a resource file with the given path. Resources imported with this keyword are set into the test suite scope similarly when importing them in the Setting table using the Resource setting. The given path must be absolute or found from [http://robotframework.org/robotframework/latest/RobotFrameworkUserGuide.html#pythonpath-jythonpath-and-ironpythonpath| search path]. Forward slashes can be used as path separator regardless the operating system. Examples: | Import Resource | ${CURDIR}/resource.txt | | Import Resource | ${CURDIR}/../resources/resource.html | | Import Resource | found_from_pythonpath.robot | """ try: self._namespace.import_resource(path) except DataError as err: raise RuntimeError(unic(err)) def set_library_search_order(self, *search_order): """Sets the resolution order to use when a name matches multiple keywords. The library search order is used to resolve conflicts when a keyword name in the test data matches multiple keywords. The first library (or resource, see below) containing the keyword is selected and that keyword implementation used. If the keyword is not found from any library (or resource), test executing fails the same way as when the search order is not set. When this keyword is used, there is no need to use the long ``LibraryName.Keyword Name`` notation. For example, instead of having | MyLibrary.Keyword | arg | | MyLibrary.Another Keyword | | MyLibrary.Keyword | xxx | you can have | Set Library Search Order | MyLibrary | | Keyword | arg | | Another Keyword | | Keyword | xxx | This keyword can be used also to set the order of keywords in different resource files. In this case resource names must be given without paths or extensions like: | Set Library Search Order | resource | another_resource | *NOTE:* - The search order is valid only in the suite where this keywords is used. - Keywords in resources always have higher priority than keywords in libraries regardless the search order. - The old order is returned and can be used to reset the search order later. - Library and resource names in the search order are both case and space insensitive. """ return self._namespace.set_search_order(search_order) def keyword_should_exist(self, name, msg=None): """Fails unless the given keyword exists in the current scope. Fails also if there are more than one keywords with the same name. Works both with the short name (e.g. ``Log``) and the full name (e.g. ``BuiltIn.Log``). The default error message can be overridden with the ``msg`` argument. See also `Variable Should Exist`. """ try: runner = self._namespace.get_runner(name) except DataError as err: raise AssertionError(msg or unic(err)) if isinstance(runner, UserErrorHandler): raise AssertionError(msg or runner.error) def get_time(self, format='timestamp', time_='NOW'): """Returns the given time in the requested format. *NOTE:* DateTime library added in Robot Framework 2.8.5 contains much more flexible keywords for getting the current date and time and for date and time handling in general. How time is returned is determined based on the given ``format`` string as follows. Note that all checks are case-insensitive. 1) If ``format`` contains the word ``epoch``, the time is returned in seconds after the UNIX epoch (1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC). The return value is always an integer. 2) If ``format`` contains any of the words ``year``, ``month``, ``day``, ``hour``, ``min``, or ``sec``, only the selected parts are returned. The order of the returned parts is always the one in the previous sentence and the order of words in ``format`` is not significant. The parts are returned as zero-padded strings (e.g. May -> ``05``). 3) Otherwise (and by default) the time is returned as a timestamp string in the format ``2006-02-24 15:08:31``. By default this keyword returns the current local time, but that can be altered using ``time`` argument as explained below. Note that all checks involving strings are case-insensitive. 1) If ``time`` is a number, or a string that can be converted to a number, it is interpreted as seconds since the UNIX epoch. This documentation was originally written about 1177654467 seconds after the epoch. 2) If ``time`` is a timestamp, that time will be used. Valid timestamp formats are ``YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss`` and ``YYYYMMDD hhmmss``. 3) If ``time`` is equal to ``NOW`` (default), the current local time is used. This time is got using Python's ``time.time()`` function. 4) If ``time`` is equal to ``UTC``, the current time in [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coordinated_Universal_Time|UTC] is used. This time is got using ``time.time() + time.altzone`` in Python. 5) If ``time`` is in the format like ``NOW - 1 day`` or ``UTC + 1 hour 30 min``, the current local/UTC time plus/minus the time specified with the time string is used. The time string format is described in an appendix of Robot Framework User Guide. Examples (expecting the current local time is 2006-03-29 15:06:21): | ${time} = | Get Time | | | | | ${secs} = | Get Time | epoch | | | | ${year} = | Get Time | return year | | | | ${yyyy} | ${mm} | ${dd} = | Get Time | year,month,day | | @{time} = | Get Time | year month day hour min sec | | | | ${y} | ${s} = | Get Time | seconds and year | | => | ${time} = '2006-03-29 15:06:21' | ${secs} = 1143637581 | ${year} = '2006' | ${yyyy} = '2006', ${mm} = '03', ${dd} = '29' | @{time} = ['2006', '03', '29', '15', '06', '21'] | ${y} = '2006' | ${s} = '21' Examples (expecting the current local time is 2006-03-29 15:06:21 and UTC time is 2006-03-29 12:06:21): | ${time} = | Get Time | | 1177654467 | # Time given as epoch seconds | | ${secs} = | Get Time | sec | 2007-04-27 09:14:27 | # Time given as a timestamp | | ${year} = | Get Time | year | NOW | # The local time of execution | | @{time} = | Get Time | hour min sec | NOW + 1h 2min 3s | # 1h 2min 3s added to the local time | | @{utc} = | Get Time | hour min sec | UTC | # The UTC time of execution | | ${hour} = | Get Time | hour | UTC - 1 hour | # 1h subtracted from the UTC time | => | ${time} = '2007-04-27 09:14:27' | ${secs} = 27 | ${year} = '2006' | @{time} = ['16', '08', '24'] | @{utc} = ['12', '06', '21'] | ${hour} = '11' Support for UTC time was added in Robot Framework 2.7.5 but it did not work correctly until 2.7.7. """ return get_time(format, parse_time(time_)) def evaluate(self, expression, modules=None, namespace=None): """Evaluates the given expression in Python and returns the results. ``expression`` is evaluated in Python as explained in `Evaluating expressions`. ``modules`` argument can be used to specify a comma separated list of Python modules to be imported and added to the evaluation namespace. ``namespace`` argument can be used to pass a custom evaluation namespace as a dictionary. Possible ``modules`` are added to this namespace. This is a new feature in Robot Framework 2.8.4. Variables used like ``${variable}`` are replaced in the expression before evaluation. Variables are also available in the evaluation namespace and can be accessed using special syntax ``$variable``. This is a new feature in Robot Framework 2.9 and it is explained more thoroughly in `Evaluating expressions`. Examples (expecting ``${result}`` is 3.14): | ${status} = | Evaluate | 0 < ${result} < 10 | # Would also work with string '3.14' | | ${status} = | Evaluate | 0 < $result < 10 | # Using variable itself, not string representation | | ${random} = | Evaluate | random.randint(0, sys.maxint) | modules=random, sys | | ${ns} = | Create Dictionary | x=${4} | y=${2} | | ${result} = | Evaluate | x*10 + y | namespace=${ns} | => | ${status} = True | ${random} = <random integer> | ${result} = 42 """ variables = self._variables.as_dict(decoration=False) expression = self._handle_variables_in_expression(expression, variables) namespace = self._create_evaluation_namespace(namespace, modules) variables = self._decorate_variables_for_evaluation(variables) try: if not is_string(expression): raise TypeError("Expression must be string, got %s." % type_name(expression)) if not expression: raise ValueError("Expression cannot be empty.") return eval(expression, namespace, variables) except: raise RuntimeError("Evaluating expression '%s' failed: %s" % (expression, get_error_message())) def _handle_variables_in_expression(self, expression, variables): if not is_string(expression): return expression tokens = [] variable_started = seen_variable = False generated = generate_tokens(StringIO(expression).readline) for toknum, tokval, _, _, _ in generated: if variable_started: if toknum == token.NAME: if tokval not in variables: variable_not_found('$%s' % tokval, variables, deco_braces=False) tokval = 'RF_VAR_' + tokval seen_variable = True else: tokens.append((token.ERRORTOKEN, '$')) variable_started = False if toknum == token.ERRORTOKEN and tokval == '$': variable_started = True else: tokens.append((toknum, tokval)) if seen_variable: return untokenize(tokens).strip() return expression def _create_evaluation_namespace(self, namespace, modules): namespace = dict(namespace or {}) modules = modules.replace(' ', '').split(',') if modules else [] namespace.update((m, __import__(m)) for m in modules if m) return namespace def _decorate_variables_for_evaluation(self, variables): decorated = [('RF_VAR_' + name, value) for name, value in variables.items()] return NormalizedDict(decorated, ignore='_') def call_method(self, object, method_name, *args, **kwargs): """Calls the named method of the given object with the provided arguments. The possible return value from the method is returned and can be assigned to a variable. Keyword fails both if the object does not have a method with the given name or if executing the method raises an exception. Support for ``**kwargs`` is new in Robot Framework 2.9. Since that possible equal signs in other arguments must be escaped with a backslash like ``\\=``. Examples: | Call Method | ${hashtable} | put | myname | myvalue | | ${isempty} = | Call Method | ${hashtable} | isEmpty | | | Should Not Be True | ${isempty} | | | | | ${value} = | Call Method | ${hashtable} | get | myname | | Should Be Equal | ${value} | myvalue | | | | Call Method | ${object} | kwargs | name=value | foo=bar | | Call Method | ${object} | positional | escaped\\=equals | """ try: method = getattr(object, method_name) except AttributeError: raise RuntimeError("Object '%s' does not have method '%s'." % (object, method_name)) try: return method(*args, **kwargs) except: raise RuntimeError("Calling method '%s' failed: %s" % (method_name, get_error_message())) def regexp_escape(self, *patterns): """Returns each argument string escaped for use as a regular expression. This keyword can be used to escape strings to be used with `Should Match Regexp` and `Should Not Match Regexp` keywords. Escaping is done with Python's ``re.escape()`` function. Examples: | ${escaped} = | Regexp Escape | ${original} | | @{strings} = | Regexp Escape | @{strings} | """ if len(patterns) == 0: return '' if len(patterns) == 1: return re.escape(patterns[0]) return [re.escape(p) for p in patterns] def set_test_message(self, message, append=False): """Sets message for the current test case. If the optional ``append`` argument is given a true value (see `Boolean arguments`), the given ``message`` is added after the possible earlier message by joining the messages with a space. In test teardown this keyword can alter the possible failure message, but otherwise failures override messages set by this keyword. Notice that in teardown the message is available as a built-in variable ``${TEST MESSAGE}``. It is possible to use HTML format in the message by starting the message with ``*HTML*``. Examples: | Set Test Message | My message | | | Set Test Message | is continued. | append=yes | | Should Be Equal | ${TEST MESSAGE} | My message is continued. | | Set Test Message | `*`HTML`*` <b>Hello!</b> | | This keyword can not be used in suite setup or suite teardown. Support for ``append`` was added in Robot Framework 2.7.7 and support for HTML format in 2.8. """ test = self._context.test if not test: raise RuntimeError("'Set Test Message' keyword cannot be used in " "suite setup or teardown.") test.message = self._get_possibly_appended_value(test.message, message, append) if self._context.in_test_teardown: self._variables.set_test("${TEST_MESSAGE}", test.message) message, level = self._get_logged_test_message_and_level(test.message) self.log('Set test message to:\n%s' % message, level) def _get_possibly_appended_value(self, initial, new, append): if not is_unicode(new): new = unic(new) if is_truthy(append) and initial: return '%s %s' % (initial, new) return new def _get_logged_test_message_and_level(self, message): if message.startswith('*HTML*'): return message[6:].lstrip(), 'HTML' return message, 'INFO' def set_test_documentation(self, doc, append=False): """Sets documentation for the current test case. By default the possible existing documentation is overwritten, but this can be changed using the optional ``append`` argument similarly as with `Set Test Message` keyword. The current test documentation is available as a built-in variable ``${TEST DOCUMENTATION}``. This keyword can not be used in suite setup or suite teardown. New in Robot Framework 2.7. Support for ``append`` was added in 2.7.7. """ test = self._context.test if not test: raise RuntimeError("'Set Test Documentation' keyword cannot be " "used in suite setup or teardown.") test.doc = self._get_possibly_appended_value(test.doc, doc, append) self._variables.set_test('${TEST_DOCUMENTATION}', test.doc) self.log('Set test documentation to:\n%s' % test.doc) def set_suite_documentation(self, doc, append=False, top=False): """Sets documentation for the current test suite. By default the possible existing documentation is overwritten, but this can be changed using the optional ``append`` argument similarly as with `Set Test Message` keyword. This keyword sets the documentation of the current suite by default. If the optional ``top`` argument is given a true value (see `Boolean arguments`), the documentation of the top level suite is altered instead. The documentation of the current suite is available as a built-in variable ``${SUITE DOCUMENTATION}``. New in Robot Framework 2.7. Support for ``append`` and ``top`` were added in 2.7.7. """ top = is_truthy(top) suite = self._get_context(top).suite suite.doc = self._get_possibly_appended_value(suite.doc, doc, append) self._variables.set_suite('${SUITE_DOCUMENTATION}', suite.doc, top) self.log('Set suite documentation to:\n%s' % suite.doc) def set_suite_metadata(self, name, value, append=False, top=False): """Sets metadata for the current test suite. By default possible existing metadata values are overwritten, but this can be changed using the optional ``append`` argument similarly as with `Set Test Message` keyword. This keyword sets the metadata of the current suite by default. If the optional ``top`` argument is given a true value (see `Boolean arguments`), the metadata of the top level suite is altered instead. The metadata of the current suite is available as a built-in variable ``${SUITE METADATA}`` in a Python dictionary. Notice that modifying this variable directly has no effect on the actual metadata the suite has. New in Robot Framework 2.7.4. Support for ``append`` and ``top`` were added in 2.7.7. """ top = is_truthy(top) if not is_unicode(name): name = unic(name) metadata = self._get_context(top).suite.metadata original = metadata.get(name, '') metadata[name] = self._get_possibly_appended_value(original, value, append) self._variables.set_suite('${SUITE_METADATA}', metadata.copy(), top) self.log("Set suite metadata '%s' to value '%s'." % (name, metadata[name])) def set_tags(self, *tags): """Adds given ``tags`` for the current test or all tests in a suite. When this keyword is used inside a test case, that test gets the specified tags and other tests are not affected. If this keyword is used in a suite setup, all test cases in that suite, recursively, gets the given tags. It is a failure to use this keyword in a suite teardown. The current tags are available as a built-in variable ``@{TEST TAGS}``. See `Remove Tags` if you want to remove certain tags and `Fail` if you want to fail the test case after setting and/or removing tags. """ ctx = self._context if ctx.test: ctx.test.tags.add(tags) ctx.variables.set_test('@{TEST_TAGS}', list(ctx.test.tags)) elif not ctx.in_suite_teardown: ctx.suite.set_tags(tags, persist=True) else: raise RuntimeError("'Set Tags' cannot be used in suite teardown.") self.log('Set tag%s %s.' % (s(tags), seq2str(tags))) def remove_tags(self, *tags): """Removes given ``tags`` from the current test or all tests in a suite. Tags can be given exactly or using a pattern where ``*`` matches anything and ``?`` matches one character. This keyword can affect either one test case or all test cases in a test suite similarly as `Set Tags` keyword. The current tags are available as a built-in variable ``@{TEST TAGS}``. Example: | Remove Tags | mytag | something-* | ?ython | See `Set Tags` if you want to add certain tags and `Fail` if you want to fail the test case after setting and/or removing tags. """ ctx = self._context if ctx.test: ctx.test.tags.remove(tags) ctx.variables.set_test('@{TEST_TAGS}', list(ctx.test.tags)) elif not ctx.in_suite_teardown: ctx.suite.set_tags(remove=tags, persist=True) else: raise RuntimeError("'Remove Tags' cannot be used in suite teardown.") self.log('Removed tag%s %s.' % (s(tags), seq2str(tags))) def get_library_instance(self, name=None, all=False): """Returns the currently active instance of the specified test library. This keyword makes it easy for test libraries to interact with other test libraries that have state. This is illustrated by the Python example below: | from robot.libraries.BuiltIn import BuiltIn | | def title_should_start_with(expected): | seleniumlib = BuiltIn().get_library_instance('SeleniumLibrary') | title = seleniumlib.get_title() | if not title.startswith(expected): | raise AssertionError("Title '%s' did not start with '%s'" | % (title, expected)) It is also possible to use this keyword in the test data and pass the returned library instance to another keyword. If a library is imported with a custom name, the ``name`` used to get the instance must be that name and not the original library name. If the optional argument ``all`` is given a true value, then a dictionary mapping all library names to instances will be returned. This feature is new in Robot Framework 2.9.2. Example: | &{all libs} = | Get library instance | all=True | """ if is_truthy(all): return self._namespace.get_library_instances() try: return self._namespace.get_library_instance(name) except DataError as err: raise RuntimeError(unic(err))
[docs]class BuiltIn(_Verify, _Converter, _Variables, _RunKeyword, _Control, _Misc): """An always available standard library with often needed keywords. ``BuiltIn`` is Robot Framework's standard library that provides a set of generic keywords needed often. It is imported automatically and thus always available. The provided keywords can be used, for example, for verifications (e.g. `Should Be Equal`, `Should Contain`), conversions (e.g. `Convert To Integer`) and for various other purposes (e.g. `Log`, `Sleep`, `Run Keyword If`, `Set Global Variable`). == Table of contents == - `HTML error messages` - `Evaluating expressions` - `Boolean arguments` - `Multiline string comparisons` - `Shortcuts` - `Keywords` = HTML error messages = Many of the keywords accept an optional error message to use if the keyword fails. Starting from Robot Framework 2.8, it is possible to use HTML in these messages by prefixing them with ``*HTML*``. See `Fail` keyword for a usage example. Notice that using HTML in messages is not limited to BuiltIn library but works with any error message. = Evaluating expressions = Many keywords, such as `Evaluate`, `Run Keyword If` and `Should Be True`, accept an expression that is evaluated in Python. These expressions are evaluated using Python's [https://docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#eval|eval] function so that all Python built-ins like ``len()`` and ``int()`` are available. `Evaluate` allows configuring the execution namespace with custom modules, and other keywords have [https://docs.python.org/2/library/os.html|os] and [https://docs.python.org/2/library/sys.html|sys] modules available automatically. Examples: | `Run Keyword If` | os.sep == '/' | Log | Not on Windows | | ${random int} = | `Evaluate` | random.randint(0, 5) | modules=random | When a variable is used in the expressing using the normal ``${variable}`` syntax, its value is replaces before the expression is evaluated. This means that the value used in the expression will be the string representation of the variable value, not the variable value itself. This is not a problem with numbers and other objects that have a string representation that can be evaluated directly, but with other objects the behavior depends on the string representation. Most importantly, strings must always be quoted, and if they can contain newlines, they must be triple quoted. Examples: | `Should Be True` | ${rc} < 10 | Return code greater than 10 | | `Run Keyword If` | '${status}' == 'PASS' | Log | Passed | | `Run Keyword If` | 'FAIL' in '''${output}''' | Log | Output contains FAIL | Starting from Robot Framework 2.9, variables themselves are automatically available in the evaluation namespace. They can be accessed using special variable syntax without the curly braces like ``$variable``. These variables should never be quoted, and in fact they are not even replaced inside strings. Examples: | `Should Be True` | $rc < 10 | Return code greater than 10 | | `Run Keyword If` | $status == 'PASS' | `Log` | Passed | | `Run Keyword If` | 'FAIL' in $output | `Log` | Output contains FAIL | | `Should Be True` | len($result) > 1 and $result[1] == 'OK' | Notice that instead of creating complicated expressions, it is often better to move the logic into a test library. = Boolean arguments = Some keywords accept arguments that are handled as Boolean values true or false. If such an argument is given as a string, it is considered false if it is either empty or case-insensitively equal to ``false`` or ``no``. Keywords verifying something that allow dropping actual and expected values from the possible error message also consider string ``no values`` as false. Other strings are considered true regardless their value, and other argument types are tested using same [http://docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#truth-value-testing|rules as in Python]. True examples: | `Should Be Equal` | ${x} | ${y} | Custom error | values=True | # Strings are generally true. | | `Should Be Equal` | ${x} | ${y} | Custom error | values=yes | # Same as the above. | | `Should Be Equal` | ${x} | ${y} | Custom error | values=${TRUE} | # Python ``True`` is true. | | `Should Be Equal` | ${x} | ${y} | Custom error | values=${42} | # Numbers other than 0 are true. | False examples: | `Should Be Equal` | ${x} | ${y} | Custom error | values=False | # String ``false`` is false. | | `Should Be Equal` | ${x} | ${y} | Custom error | values=no | # Also string ``no`` is false. | | `Should Be Equal` | ${x} | ${y} | Custom error | values=${EMPTY} | # Empty string is false. | | `Should Be Equal` | ${x} | ${y} | Custom error | values=${FALSE} | # Python ``False`` is false. | | `Should Be Equal` | ${x} | ${y} | Custom error | values=no values | # ``no values`` works with ``values`` argument | Note that prior to Robot Framework 2.9 some keywords considered all non-empty strings, including ``false`` and ``no``, to be true. = Multiline string comparisons = `Should Be Equal` and `Should Be Equal As Strings` report the failures using [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diff_utility#Unified_format|unified diff format] if both strings have more than two lines. New in Robot Framework 2.9.1. Example: | ${first} = | `Catenate` | SEPARATOR=\\n | Not in second | Same | Differs | Same | | ${second} = | `Catenate` | SEPARATOR=\\n | Same | Differs2 | Same | Not in first | | `Should Be Equal` | ${first} | ${second} | Results in the following error message: | Multiline strings are different: | --- first | +++ second | @@ -1,4 +1,4 @@ | -Not in second | Same | -Differs | +Differs2 | Same | +Not in first """ ROBOT_LIBRARY_SCOPE = 'GLOBAL' ROBOT_LIBRARY_VERSION = get_version()
[docs]class RobotNotRunningError(AttributeError): """Used when something cannot be done because Robot is not running. Based on AttributeError to be backwards compatible with RF < 2.8.5. May later be based directly on Exception, so new code should except this exception explicitly. """ pass
[docs]def register_run_keyword(library, keyword, args_to_process=None, deprecation_warning=True): """Registers 'run keyword' so that its arguments can be handled correctly. *NOTE:* This API will change in RF 3.1. For more information see https://github.com/robotframework/robotframework/issues/2190. Use with `deprecation_warning=False` to avoid related deprecation warnings. 1) Why is this method needed Keywords running other keywords internally (normally using `Run Keyword` or some variants of it in BuiltIn) must have the arguments meant to the internally executed keyword handled specially to prevent processing them twice. This is done ONLY for keywords registered using this method. If the register keyword has same name as any keyword from Robot Framework standard libraries, it can be used without getting warnings. Normally there is a warning in such cases unless the keyword is used in long format (e.g. MyLib.Keyword). Keywords executed by registered run keywords can be tested in dry-run mode if they have 'name' argument which takes the name of the executed keyword. 2) How to use this method `library` is the name of the library where the registered keyword is implemented. `keyword` can be either a function or method implementing the keyword, or name of the implemented keyword as a string. `args_to_process` is needed when `keyword` is given as a string, and it defines how many of the arguments to the registered keyword must be processed normally. When `keyword` is a method or function, this information is got directly from it so that varargs (those specified with syntax '*args') are not processed but others are. 3) Examples from robot.libraries.BuiltIn import BuiltIn, register_run_keyword def my_run_keyword(name, *args): # do something return BuiltIn().run_keyword(name, *args) # Either one of these works register_run_keyword(__name__, my_run_keyword) register_run_keyword(__name__, 'My Run Keyword', 1) ------------- from robot.libraries.BuiltIn import BuiltIn, register_run_keyword class MyLibrary: def my_run_keyword_if(self, expression, name, *args): # do something return BuiltIn().run_keyword_if(expression, name, *args) # Either one of these works register_run_keyword('MyLibrary', MyLibrary.my_run_keyword_if) register_run_keyword('MyLibrary', 'my_run_keyword_if', 2) """ RUN_KW_REGISTER.register_run_keyword(library, keyword, args_to_process, deprecation_warning)